June 8, 2022

Becoming A Technical Writer | A Mix Of Coding, UX, and/or Writing


Hello developers! I can't emphasize enough how many different career paths there are for you if you enjoy coding. If you want to mix your technical skills with a passion for UX or even write internal documentation for developers, have you considered becoming a technical writer? I brought on a technical writer to share more about what her job is like and how she landed her position. She actually started off going to a coding bootcamp with the goal of becoming a software engineer, but found something she enjoyed even more. There's tons of advice packed into this shorter episode. If you're still exploring tech career options, this episode is worth checking out.

Kailana Kahawaii (guest):
Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/kailanakahawaii

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Transcript

Don Hansen:

Welcome back to another web development podcast episode, where we help aspiring developers get jobs and junior developers grow in this episode, we're going to be talking about how to become a technical writer and what that even means what your day to day is like. So I invited one on, um, I hope I don't butcher it Kylie. That's right. You know, it's going to butcher it. Um, so I brought Kylana on to talk more about her journey and you know what it's like being one, uh, she's going to provide some advice, but yeah. Uh, Carolina, I appreciate you coming on. Thank you.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Thank you for making

Don Hansen:

me so. Who are you? What do you do? Give it a little bit of an intro.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah. So, um, my name is Kylana. I'm a technical writer at acquire. Um, we basically have, uh, a customer engagement platform, so I write, um, a lot of the documentation for that.

Don Hansen:

Okay. How long have you been doing that?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Uh, I was first, uh, hired. February of 2021. So more than a year now.

Don Hansen:

Okay. Yeah. Um, well, yeah, I guess walk me through, cause it looks like I have your LinkedIn pulled up on the side. Uh, you were a technical writer before at a previous company too, right? Um,

Kailana Kahawaii:

I did a little bit of tech writing there, so I would say it was a more like tech writing role where there's like a lot of marketing involved. Um, so I pretty much wrote. Maybe like blog posts and promotional things for hackathons. That's what I did before coming to this role.

Don Hansen:

Gotcha. For hackathons too. That's pretty cool. Well, let's actually spin on that. So walk me through kind of your, your journey. Um, you know, feel free to share your old industry as well, but, um, how did you become a technical.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Some of the teacher before this, um, I was an English teacher and there was just an opportunity to, um, move to Seattle, um, where I, where I am right now. And I started looking into like, what could I do there? Um, and I was pretty sure I was like, I don't want to do teaching again. It was like, Yeah, I just figured out like, it wasn't really for me. Um, and then I heard about like coding boot camps here, and that's when I started, um, looking into coding boot camps. I did, uh, the flat iron program. And then after that, I, um, did democracy lab, which is the hackathon. Um, service, uh, that I started writing marketing material for, and then eventually I was hired by, um, acquire.

Don Hansen:

Gotcha. So when you went through the coding boot camp, was your goal to become a software.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah, I think so. I think I had a really interesting vision of what a software engineer was in my head. So I thought they like controlled the whole process, which is like really ridiculous now that I look back. But no, they, they don't control like the whole process of making the product and breaking it to market. Like now they don't do that. Um, but that's what I had thought, like, as I went into it and as I learn more about it, Maybe like UX and UI design was something I should have done, like looked at it more. Um, but yeah, so, but yeah, I did, I did the whole thing. So there it is.

Don Hansen:

Yeah. Um, oh wait, flat iron I'm taking of something else. Um, a second, like your program is like nine months long, but um, okay, well, so why don't you start steering towards like I'm a product manager. Why UX design.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Um, what I, why I wanted to get into software development was because, um, as a teacher, I used a lot of products that, um, I guess we were mandated to use. Uh, and they were just some of the most awful experiences. Like I try to put like students' grades in and the system would like not save it. And there was like, no warning message. It would just like drop. And I was like, I just put it. 30 students grade, not the took all over again. And they were like, just so many other design things. I thought, I, I think I could like write this thing better than the people who designed it. Um, so that's like really what pushed me into like, learning more about development and coding and things like that. So,

Don Hansen:

yeah. Okay. Well, that's good. I'm glad you didn't shy away from wanting to change your old industry software. Um, and I think a lot of us can relate to that. So I guess I'm just trying to put it together a little bit. Um, you thought, so you, you essentially wanted to make probably more of a usable product, so maybe UX and design kind of attracted you in that way. Um, and then you went and became a technical writer. Yeah. What made you decide to go that route? Cause it almost seems like a little bit of a pivot.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Um, I just always liked writing I'm an English degree. So it kinda like really made a lot of sense. And last I like coded, um, during the bootcamp I realized like, I don't want to be doing this for like eight hours straight every day. Just looking at code. I like it as kind of like a hobby or something I can do to like. Automate some work things that just like coding every day was not what made me happy. I didn't like writing has always, really just made me happy. So it just, it made a lot of sense. And just to apply, um, that technical aspects of like I had done like the software engineering program. So like just being able to apply that to my writing right now is like, I think really. Great. Um, yeah, I can also be education part, so I can like kind of break down these like technical concepts or like pretty much, uh, Basic customers who might not have those tech savvy skills. So I think like kind of everything fell into place to be a technical writer. I get to like help, um, kind of like have a say in what the product kind of is like on the product side. Cause I'm, I sit on the product team at my company. So. Kind of say, okay. Maybe like we should think about like this use case. Um, and I also write the documentation and I also maybe like do some more like developer documentation as well, such as like API APIs and things like that. So everything kind of just like, is there like a really good like, um, fit for me? I, I

Don Hansen:

guess. Okay. I'm glad you kind of found that, um, synergy, um, especially with what you love to do previously. So I think I'm still trying to understand. Technical writing. And it, it sounds like, um, so you're, you're focused on the product teams here, essentially building out a lot of the documentation around the product that bolt users are going to see, and even what your developers are going to see in the backend. Right. Okay. Um, at walk me through a little bit more of your day to day as a technical writer. Like, are you 95% of the day just writing all this documentation? Is it like a lot of meetings? What's your day to day?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Um, I wouldn't say I right, like 95%. No. Um, a lot of it, I guess it can change a lot because I do work at a startup and like, things are always changing at startups as well. I will say that, um, when I first got in, I wrote a lot of articles, um, designed for users of the product. So it was like, what happens when you click this button or what happens when you use the setting? And a lot of things like that. Um, So a lot of. Like the articles on our health based. I, I wrote in like, eventually we had like, almost like more than a hundred articles that like for each like component of our product. So that's kind of what I did. So that's what I managed, like our health base. And if we have like a new release, I'll go in and like change up the articles or anything like that. Um, and also we have, um, Product releases every week. So I also write the documentation for that. Um, so I say, okay, this ticket came out. It helps this customer, um, things like that. So I guess like it's hard to pigeonhole. Technical writer. Exactly does. Cause it's so different across companies and things like that. And even across industries, people like reached out to me, like, do you want to work for this? And like, no, I don't know how to write for pharmaceutical companies. Like is very, very tech focused. So yeah, I think, yeah. Yeah. Maybe like, um, yeah, this is just my, my experience here.

Don Hansen:

Okay. That's interesting. So. Do you feel like companies consider people for those types of positions when it synergizes with their old industry when they actually know the industry? Cause you, you mentioned pharmaceutical is kind of out of your wheelhouse.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah. Um, I think there are like certain times of times the technical writer can write for that kind of thing, but I, I guess they would just have that like experience or maybe a certification for that. Um, I think there's a lot of ways to apply like that kind of writing to different like aspects. Cause they're like there's technical writers everywhere, right? Like government and like just so many things. Um, I think just like having good writing skills can kind of like help you succeed in here. If you want to be a technical writer. Honestly, I think it's, it's, it's really strong on, um, on the writing skills.

Don Hansen:

How do you prove that? How do you prove you have?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah, so, um, I had a blog, so, um, I know you interviewed flat iron students, so I'm one of your career search? Um, requirements was like writing and blog and like a lot of my classmates thought like, oh, if you don't want to do this, but like, I loved it. Cause like, oh my gosh, this is so much fun. Yeah. I like, I love taking screenshots of my projects and just. Explaining like, okay. I made this decision because of whatever, like I use this like library because, and then I just give the reason why, but yeah, it just, it really helped me like discover who I was as like an engineer, almost like writing those blog posts and. I even looked back at its day and it's like, oh, okay. I actually knew how to use that library at one point. Like I said, well now, but yeah,

Don Hansen:

that's pretty cool. I mean, I, I'm sure a lot of your other classmates weren't too keen on it, but. Um, just even as a software engineer, just being able to document your process and expose that and show employers, you know, how you're even thinking. Um, I, it, it skipped me through most of my technical portions in my interview. It's, um, it's really powerful and that a lot of people want to do it, including me. I hate writing, but I did it because it was effective. Um, that's interesting. Okay. So a book, do you create video con. Yeah, I

Kailana Kahawaii:

do. Yeah. So, um, I also do some of the instructional design for the product as well. So, um, yeah, I just make like a library of videos, teaching people how to use our product. And also, um, there's kind of a course I've made with other coworkers. Um, also teaching people how to use the product.

Don Hansen:

Okay. That's pretty cool. I think that'd be fun. Yeah.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah. It is fun. I do enjoy it. It is a lot of work. Like you think like a one minute video is going to take like maybe an hour to like, no, it's going to take like, maybe like at least five hours, depending on what you want.

Don Hansen:

I mean, I'm talking even with other YouTubers that are doing course content at right. Essentially like tutorials. Um, yeah, it's exponentially more than the actual edited version. It takes a long time. Huh? Okay. That's pretty cool. So you, you essentially own this entire kind of a front facing documentation and tutorials and courses that. Teach both your user base and, you know, even just employees in the company, how to effectively use your product. Um, I can say for certain, there's a big difference as a software engineer, working for a company with poor documentation and great documentation, a very big difference. Um, so I, I appreciate you for what you do is essentially what I'm trying to. Um, but who do you think you kind of mentioned that you have to enjoy writing, but if someone were to watch this, the video or listened to the episode, how could they identify that they might really enjoy this? Is it just, you enjoy writing blog posts?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah. I think anybody who enjoys writing a blog posts, especially if they're trying to teach somebody something would really enjoy technical writing. I do think in our to do like this, this kind of job where I write about this software product. Bunch of different components. I think you would need a little bit of that background that I got from the software engineering, who cam to be able to like, just learn no, like how to know about like crud and API APIs and how like systems talk to each other. I think that would be important. Um, yeah, so. If somebody is really interested in, um, being a technical writer, I don't think you need to do a bootcamp for it. I would probably not do that. Um, but there are like so many other I've seen before, such as like a master's course, if you have like bachelor's degree doing like a master's program for that, or, or yeah. Even like, just like online courses I've seen. So yeah. There's, I think there's a bunch of different routes to getting into.

Don Hansen:

What would you have done if he didn't go to a coding bootcamp to get to this?

Kailana Kahawaii:

I think that would have done the UI UX design, not maybe not the bootcamp, there's like that Google course now that you can do as well. But I think that would really prepare me for just thinking about how people use software products. I think that's really important when you. Right. Like user guides, like how is somebody going to use this? And like, what is their use case going to be? Is that going to change based on the customer? Um, and what pain points can they run into? Like all of those things you might want to consider when you're writing this technical

Don Hansen:

documentation. Gotcha. Interesting. Okay. I didn't really think about it in that. If he were to learn. Okay. I guess I'm going to push this a bit. Um, so UX and UI is what you probably would have focused on. Um, I guess just to clarify, would that have been more helpful than a coding bootcamp focused on software engineering?

Kailana Kahawaii:

No. No. If I could say for sure now that I'm on this side of the, I don't know. River, I guess I don't know how I want us to describe that. Um, but I think kind of just going further and maybe developing things more on the product side, I think UX UI is maybe more of something you want to focus on. Not just. Like technical writing, but like product writing and copywriting for the product you really want to consider, like who's using a product and how long, like should a message should be like, you want to, like, maybe you have to be kind of like detail oriented in that fact. Um, and really just like. Yeah. Cause we, we look at like software products all the time and there's like so many different messages where we're in contact with. And then some, like, you don't really remember the good experiences, right? Like using software, you remember like the really bad ones. So that's what, like, you want to stay away from when you're like, um, creating like products and things like that. Okay.

Don Hansen:

Yeah. What, I guess I'm where you described, it sounds kind of like a copywriter. Position a little bit, and it sounds like it is UX focused. What actually makes it a technical writing position? Is it the responsibility of writing? Um, I guess documentation for developers specifically? Like what if you took that out and you're just writing essentially like product documentation. Is that still a technical writing position?

Kailana Kahawaii:

I think product documentation would still be considered like technical writing. In that kind of realm, because there are a lot of companies looking for people who can write both like the customer facing side of things. So writing like user guides, um, and that kind of way, and also writing like developer documentation, like other, no something like, okay, these are the things that we need in the product and things like that. So, um, yeah, I think don't be discouraged, discouraged if you're like. I think that technical writing is a very like clinical, like those big, like stacks of documents and big manuals that you'd never read. You just throw out when you get like the software bug. It's so way more than that. Um, and I think a lot of, um, companies, especially like in tech, they want people who can write. Um, and make an enjoyable experience to read too, because they don't want, they don't want to sit through like that big, like document thing. Right? Like you want like this short and sweetest story and then like, if they need the details, they can dive into like the rest of it.

Don Hansen:

Yeah. I mean, the way, the way you're even describing it, it sounds a lot less. Let less cold. It sounds friendly and warm and like really understanding your users. Um, cause when I thought of a technical writer, I just thought it was like writing documentation for developers. It sounds like something I might enjoy if I did go that route. Um, what do you hate about it? Uh, to I hate,

Kailana Kahawaii:

I don't think there's anything really specific. I hate about technical writing. Um,

Don Hansen:

Gosh,

Kailana Kahawaii:

I guess I, I guess I'll just like put, put some advice out there is like, I was like, so against like using software products to like, like look at my grammar and writing and stuff, but actually it's been really great and I use it every day now. Um, yeah. So something like that, I guess just like the English portion of it. Um, yeah, don't be, I guess, too. Like everybody can benefit from those kinds of tools. So yeah, don't be too like, oh, I don't need that tool. I'm already great. Like yeah. Just sees those tools they're there and if they're free, like yeah, I do use it.

Don Hansen:

I use one. I don't know what it's called. Um, yeah, it doesn't tell me, but yeah, highly recommend it. Anyone that's around

Kailana Kahawaii:

or things like that. Yeah.

Don Hansen:

Do you, is there an opportunity to use any AI tools to help formulate some of the bulk of your writings?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Not really. Um, no, I wouldn't say there's anything like that right now. Um, especially this lucky. Into it? No, what I do though, um, for the knowledge base, if I need to like, say like I update an article or I delete an article, um, that article might. There might be a link to that article, a different article. And it's like, when you have like a hundred more, a hundred plus articles to like sift through, like you're never going to find it on your own. Right. Um, so what I did was I wrote like a web scraping script to help me just like, find all the articles with like 4 0 4 errors. So that was like, that's something like, that's how I automated my, my life like that. Yeah. That's pretty convenient. Yeah. So. Having those skills, like really, really helped me do that kind of stuff.

Don Hansen:

Okay. It almost speaks more to, I think, coding and just even getting comfortable with like low code solutions to automate your workflow. It's I think it helps out a lot of different positions, even if you're not in a coding position. Okay. I think I have a pretty good feel for it. I'm going to challenge us one more time and I'm going to reword this. What. Could people potentially dislike about being a technical writer?

Kailana Kahawaii:

I think you'll need to really develop. Again, I heard this, like every podcast, you made your soft skills because you need to talk to engineers. You need to talk to, um, the people supporting your customers. You'll need to talk to product management. You'll need to talk to marketing and just managing all of those different relationships. It can be a lot at times. And, um, Um, I've, I've talked to other technical writers where they're still frustrated that, um, the engineer just wouldn't give them the documentation. They needed to do their project. And like, yeah, it's, it's really frustrating if that happens. Um, So, yeah, that's something I've heard a lot, um, from technical writers, is that yeah, just building those relationships with all of the different people involved, um, is just like so important. Maybe even more important than I wouldn't say being able to write, but like being like, like, like the best writer there was. So if you had. Choice, I guess like somebody who can build those relationships would be better than somebody who can just like, who's written, like, I don't know, like, I don't know the best technical writing document ever or something. Yeah.

Don Hansen:

That's good to know. Um, so it sounds like you're not really a people person. You don't enjoy engaging with multiple departments. This probably isn't a position you're going to end.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah. Yeah. You definitely need to talk to people to, um, understand like what they're looking for on a document. Um, many times on I've gotten like a document, a wrong and like, okay, we weren't, we didn't ask for this. We asked for this, like, okay. And then we just like, get into kind of like a conversation about like, okay, what do you need from this document? Yeah, you kind of just need to learn their perspective on things, um, in orange for it, the document to be successful. It doesn't matter like how well-written it is if it's not going to help them. Like there's no, there's no point in, um, writing it or using it.

Don Hansen:

Oh, yeah. That's that can be difficult. So you're essentially writing for different audiences.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah. Yeah. So you gotta like switch gears a little bit as well. Um, engineers might expect like the document to be structured in one way and then, um, a customer of course will need it in a different way. Hmm.

Don Hansen:

Okay. That's interesting. I can see that being a little bit challenging. What about, so I think I have two, probably two remaining questions I have in mind. I think there are a couple paths. Um, one, someone that is exploring tech right now. Right? So someone that's exploring tech and they're very open to a different options. Maybe they're considering software engineering. If they come to mind, They're probably they've looked into coding at least. Um, so someone that's kind of starting fresh that might not have a whole lot of tech experience might not even have a whole lot of writing experience. Um, and then someone that is essentially a career transitioner moving from whatever old industry they came from. Uh, Going into becoming a technical writer, potentially whether you're a software engineer and you want to good get into technical writing, whether you're a teacher that just likes writing on the side that wants to get into technical writing. Um, let's I kinda just like want to wrap it up with like breaking down if those two paths are different and what they look like. I'm good. But I want to sum up essentially what you said first, and then you correct me. Um, so someone that's kind of starting out. If I were to give someone advice based on what you said, um, and they were getting into technical writing, I would encourage them to, um, essentially. You know what, let's start with someone that's like kind of interested in coding. I would encourage them to create a blog. I'd encouraged them to try to document the process, uh, include screenshots and, and try to share why they made certain features, focus a little bit more on UX. Right. Um, so maybe it's not going to be someone that is like heavily backend focused that doesn't care. Yeah, they might not want to focus on the user, like how to, uh, present certain data to some that's a little bit more non-technical. So I think my recommendation is whatever you do pursue in tech, kind of just practice documenting it and a blog, even create LinkedIn posts, get a little bit more comfortable with your writing. Um, how would you. I guess you, you had mentioned like a master's degree, you had mentioned like a UX course, but I think a big question mark still is like, how do I get better with my writing too? I just like have pay a writer to review my content and corrected or,

Kailana Kahawaii:

Hmm. I, I didn't do any of those things. What I did was I just wrote like pretty frequently, like at least once a week. And it doesn't seem like much at first, but like, it really adds up like after. I don't know how long I had like 30 articles already, like, could use that as portfolio or stuff's unkind. And, um, yeah, I guess the, um, the sort of position I had before this one, somebody did like, look at my work and tell me okay. Like, this is how I would change it to be more like in a marketing kind of perspective. So yeah, totally. Just like looking at. It doesn't need to be like somebody paid for. I think it's even more interesting to write a document, um, and show it to somebody like you met on LinkedIn, like a mentor or something. I think they would maybe be a little bit more helpful and tell you, okay, this is what I would do. Um, in this situation, um, given this audience, I think they would maybe have that expertise to know like, Um, well, how to structure that document and what kinds of things to put in it and if you're putting too much detail and things like that. Yeah.

Don Hansen:

Okay. That's good advice for getting feedback when you're applying for the actual position though, how are you presenting yourself? Like what, what are the main things that you're prioritizing, like really make yourself stand out?

Kailana Kahawaii:

I usually, um, Looking back, like it was, it was a bit, it was a bit of a while ago, but what I did was, um, I, I did, um, post links to my blog on LinkedIn. And, uh, it was actually a recruiter who reached out to me about my current position. So I don't know exactly what I did to stand out. They, all I can think of is like, Uh, kept doing my blog and, um, yeah, maybe my background in English helps or I don't know. It could have been anything really. Yeah. Did they

Don Hansen:

ask any specific questions in the interview that caught your attention? Um,

Kailana Kahawaii:

I really liked how they gave me. Well, I think their process would probably be a little different now, but I'm just going through like a project that you made. So they asked me to just create a, create a blog post essentially on, um, teaching a user, some like how to do something. And, um, I really liked how they reviewed it with me and I could tell they had, um, Like reviewed it beforehand and they were prepared with like, questions about it. So I guess that just kind of spoke to like, they had taken the time to, um, just like research me and yeah.

Don Hansen:

Okay. Yeah. It sounds like it could be fun. Yeah. Um, I dunno if I get nervous with that type of interview, I've gotten nervous and coding challenges

Kailana Kahawaii:

before. I mean, gosh,

Don Hansen:

that can be rough. Sometimes I literally forgot. I'm like two years into me being a developer. I forgot how to use react and I've been using it for years. As soon as I went into the interview, it just like my brain shut off. Um, okay. So it kind of, okay, so. The challenge might be to essentially write a mock documentation for what you might be doing for that company. Then you're essentially just saying like, right. You know, just right. And if you can get a little feedback, find a mentor. That's great. But, um, practice is probably going to hone that skill a bit. Um, okay. I think that's pretty good advice. Do you have a general like salary range that you think an entry level, uh, person should expect for?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Really hard question because I, I looked into it too, and I was just like, I'm still not sure. Like, based on like anything. Yeah. Yeah. So I think it really just depends on the area that you're looking to, like, um, go into, cause like, like San Francisco is going to be so different from Austin or things like that. So I would really recommend just looking at the. Area that you're applying to and kind of going off of

Don Hansen:

that. Okay. What would you say for Seattle,

Kailana Kahawaii:

Seattle? Um, Well, ju well, this is more like, uh, like lifestyle thing, but I, I think I watched a video one time, or it's at like 80 grand is like 82, like a hundred is like the kind of like happy place. You're not like struggling for rent and you can still like go out and eat once in a while. So I would say, say that, but I know like there's like some which is like way lower. Way higher. I think it just all depends on like the company that hires you. So yeah. I don't know if there is a good range to find

Don Hansen:

there. That's fair. Um, because I think a lot of peoples that are going into tech, that is an important thing for them. They're trying to up their lifestyle. They want to make sure, you know, whatever they're getting into, they can afford that lifestyle. I think

Kailana Kahawaii:

it's not going to be as much as like a software engineers going to make. Right. But I think. It's still like, kind of comparable to like what you need to be comfortable and happy. So I think like that's something that was really important to me as well, so, yeah.

Don Hansen:

Okay, cool. Um, I also tossed out the scenario with like become transferring from a software engineer, into being a technical writer. Um, What if the focus, what did the software engineer just wanted to write? Like tons of API documentation, like maybe there's a big company. They joined large software engineering team. Could they join a technical writing position that just focused on API documentation for developers?

Kailana Kahawaii:

I think they could. Um, I also started writing, um, API documentation for my company. And it's not, it's not too much of a jump, especially if you've been like using API as in like your projects and things like that. Like you, you probably have a good, um, awareness of what makes like good API documentation and that I documentation at that point. And there's so many things. Tools to help you, like, just like organize it and set it up. Um, I don't think it would be too much of a problem. I think the ideal scenario though, um, would be that you kind of writes the, um, documentation to give to the engineers to build. Okay. That's what I've read is like, kind of like where, what it should be like, right? Like you're writing the directions for the API and then they build the API. Um, in my experience, it's kind of the other way around where they have already built the API. And then as the technical writer I step in and kind of just like write what they had built. Um, so. Yeah, just thinking. Cause like, I think maybe someone in my position might have a better understanding of like what the users need from the API as well. So yeah. Um, I think that process would work. So again, like it's all about users and who's going to be consuming your documentation. That's that's really important. I think that's the most important part of my job is just like really understanding how that documentation is going to be used.

Don Hansen:

You said some interesting. Yeah. So you, so essentially technical writers that are writing out documentation that then the backend developers would build out your, are they almost writing? Do they even start with like writing the technical requirements or are they just writing essentially like the output of the API? Um, do you know what they would focus on?

Kailana Kahawaii:

I guess it all depends on like, what's the right thing. Right. Um, so maybe you could reword that question and I can give you a better answer.

Don Hansen:

Um, I have a feeling the answer is still going to be, it depends. We'll we'll go with that. That's completely fine. All right. I think I have a good feel for like what a technical writer is, how to become. If you had to give like one final piece of advice for someone that was more seriously considering trying to get this type of position, what would it be?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah, I, again, just really, um, write and write blog posts and really just look into like how you're structuring your documents and. The discover, like if you want to apply for a certain company, understand like their, um, their customers or their users. And I think that will put you in a really powerful position to talk about like their needs. Um, and yeah.

Don Hansen:

A lot of really good advice. I appreciate it. Um, yeah, that's it. We're at the end of our episode already. So people want to reach out to you and anything else you want to shout out? Where could they reach you?

Kailana Kahawaii:

Um, they can reach me on LinkedIn. Um, it's finding Kylana to Hubei. Um, and yeah. Yeah. Uh, I really enjoy helping people, so yeah. Somebody, I, I reached out to so many people on LinkedIn when looking for like a job and yeah. I just want to pay it forward. That's

Don Hansen:

awesome. I think, I think more people should try reaching out to people. People are scared to do that. Yeah. Um, I guess I never was. Um, but a lot of people with. W actually, maybe that's going to ask you if people do want to, they know they need to reach out to people on LinkedIn. How did you overcome that? Because obviously you did.

Kailana Kahawaii:

Yeah, I kind of just like looked at their LinkedIn profile and tried to find common ground with them and bring it up in like a message like, oh, I saw you, um, wrote a blog post about this. Um, do you want to talk about it sometime and things like that, so, yeah.