July 20, 2022

Linkedin Tips For Aspiring Developers


LINKEDIN! It’s such an important social platform for aspiring developers, and quite the controversial one as well. Some people love it. Some people hate it.

I think most developers actually use Linkedin very ineffectively. If you’re using it the wrong way and not getting much out of it, why would you like the platform? I get it.

In this podcast episode, my goal is to solidify your strategy of using the platform to give yourself a competitive edge at landing that first dev job. I invited Shaily on, who has helped several people build up their Linkedin presence.

We didn’t just dive into advice on how to present your Linkedin profile. We also shared resume tips, integrating your past experience with future dev jobs, networking tips, content creation tips, and even our frustrations with the platform. Enjoy!

Shaily Hakimian (guest):
Website - https://www.yoursocialmediasherpa.com
Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsbk3e9sGJe7AK8hBhTmj8A
Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/hakimian45

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Transcript
Don Hansen:

Welcome back to another web development podcast episode, where we help aspiring developers get jobs and junior developers grow. So today we're gonna be conquering the topic of how the hell can aspiring developers present themselves on LinkedIn. I'm gonna be candid. A lot of developers, aspiring developers, even professional, senior developers are horrible at this, right? So we have a lot of skills under our belt that pay us or get us paid quite a bit of money from companies. And so, um, where'd you go.

Shaily Hakimian:

I sneezed friends. I sneezed. So I took myself off camp for a second.

Don Hansen:

Oh my gosh. Oh, that's fine. I thought you just disconnected. I'm like, all right, I'm gonna read the intro, but we're gonna keep going. No, you're great. So essentially we, uh, we're gonna give you some LinkedIn tips, how to present yourself on LinkedIn, how to network, how to interact. Cuz everyone says you need a network. You need a network. What the hell does that mean? So, um, I think presentation and networking are gonna be our key topics. This one. So I invited on HIL who has quite a bit of experience helping people, you know, up their presentation skills and uh, we're gonna be focused on essentially people that wanna get a job. So anyways, Shylee, welcome. Thanks for coming on. Thank

Shaily Hakimian:

you so much for having me. I am so excited to be here. I am friends with a lot of coders and developers and programmers, and I even led, I volunteered at DevOps days in Chicago, many years ago, so I love the tech world. Big fan, uh, glad to be here. Yeah.

Don Hansen:

Well, okay. So essentially, um, you know, talk a bit about, you know, like what you're doing, um, quite frankly, why people should care about your opinion with this topic.

Shaily Hakimian:

so here's the situation, right? I'm your social media Sherpa. I usually help a lot of businesses, but what I really do for people is I expose and amplify their awesomeness, and that can apply to young students that can apply to developers that can apply to solo business owners that can apply to people who wanna be influencers, whatever it can apply to a lot of different places. I'll give you this story to kind of give you a taste of like the kind of world that I take people through. So I had an intern last year and she was not a developer, but she was in the PR program and she was doing all this stuff. And I wanted to give back to my, my interns, kinda like how you give back with the show to help people find their careers and all that kind of stuff. So I do something with all of my clients, no matter what situation they're in, where I kinda. I say expose and amplify expose and amplify. They're awesome. Say, pull out what makes them special that would help other people see and understand who they are. So we talked, we talked, we talked, it was, I don't know, half an hour, four to five minutes. I was just like asking her more questions about the thing that she loved to do. And I would do this with the developer. I do this with a lot of different people and she says something about, she liked event planning, but she really didn't know what to say in her resume. Cause she was like, well, I never worked full time as an event planner. Like what can I really say? First off she didn't validate that the, that she was really good at like event planning. She didn't validate, like she didn't think it was valuable information. I'm like, oh yes, it is. The second thing is that she didn't realize that like she had more stories there to illustrate how much she loved events. This one in particular that blew my mind. She said something about her sweet 16. And she said, I don't know, was 20 years old or whatever. At the time she says, you know, I almost liked planning my sweet 16 more than I even liked going to it. And I was. Wait a second, you loved planning your sweet 16, maybe even more than you liked attending it. Like, what does that say about she? Right. It says that you really love event planning and you love it so much that like, that became such a highlight for you. And that's something you wanted to take, uh, onwards. And I think now she started working at Tribecca film festival, I think a year or two, after that, I'm like, get it girl doing events and all this kind of good stuff. Uh, but a lot of times it's not just I code Java or I code whatever I'm making this up. You have to hold me cuz I'm not a developer. So you have to hold me accountable to what developers are gonna be asking here. But, uh, if you can explain the, the sweet theme that you can bring to a company that is a unique edge in how you do developing or whatever, that's gonna make you stand out, whether it's on your LinkedIn profile or whether you mentioned it in an interview, whether you mention it to someone who might make introduction to get you a job. And that's where I come in, I help you extract all this special sauce that you can boil it to the top and people can see how wonderful you are even before you ever get on an interview with them.

Don Hansen:

Okay. So are you up for a

Shaily Hakimian:

challenge? Challenge me. Let's play it. Let's do it. Okay. Tell me, cause you know, your people, you're, you're their mouthpiece for what they're looking for.

Don Hansen:

so that's a really interesting thing. The way you basically gut her to focus on a specific aspect of that event, which was planning it right. Was more marketable, right. That was hireable potentially. And so that's a big thing. A lot of developers, they, uh, they're career transitioners or they have some experience in the background. Right. And they don't know how to relate it. So yes. A key thing with giving developers advice is your, your resume a hundred percent needs to speak to you being a developer and what value you can provide as a developer. So you have to kind of decide, okay, well, what experience actually is relevant? What isn't right. And so. You really have to hone in very quickly, even just with the bullet point of how this specific position that's not even tech related can relate to being a developer, cuz most of it's gonna be like your projects. It's gonna be showcasing your experience, but there's still value in talking about your previous experience. So here's a challenge. Huge challenge was an aquatic director before, um, before becoming a developer, right? So it's non-tech related there systems were archaic. There was no coding. I promise you. And so, but essentially I managed a team of like 26 people, four different types of positions. Um, and I had to keep the pull running. I had to make the department money. Um, aquatic specifically was kind of like a financial drain for the Y M C a cause. That's where I worked. And, but I could encourage through like, you can get discounts through, um, Signing people up through swim lessons, et cetera. And it would bring tons of membership into the facility. So that's how it kind of compensated that fin. So I was managing financials. I was managing a program. I was managing staff, et cetera, but none of it was tech related. How can I relate that essentially to being a developer?

Shaily Hakimian:

Oh man. Well, okay. I'm gonna pretend like I know what being a developer is a hundred percent like, but I'll give you a taste, right? Uh, I'm thinking of like, would you like me to

Don Hansen:

give you a quick summary of what a developer's like?

Shaily Hakimian:

Well, I mean, there's a lot of coding I'm dating. I'll tell you backend. My boyfriend's a backend guy, right? So that's, it's in the, the world of developing, I think. Is that correct? Uh, yeah.

Don Hansen:

Backend development.

Shaily Hakimian:

Right. So he's in that world. So I'll tell you this, right? Like you, like, he just, he tells me this all the time. He's like, I, you know, he doesn't ever wanna be a manager. Like that's like his nightmare, but yet here you are. You've managed a team. I think, I assume other developers don't like the management piece of it. So if that's something you liked about your job, which I would ask you, did you like it? Did you love it? What did you like? What did you wanna pull in? What would you wanna do more? And that might be an aspect you hated, but that's something you can highlight and bring to the top because I imagine most developers have never done anything like that in their life or the financial piece. Right? If there's, I know some developers do stuff with data, right? Like there's some financial data that you probably had some experience with knowing what the finances were at the pool. These are just examples I'm making up without having asked you a million other questions. Uh, I do also wanna add the girl that I was telling you, the young lady who was my intern did eventually got a job within like five days of me and her having this conversation about her loving to plan her sweet 16 with an event planner. I was like, you never know what this stuff can happen when you can explain what you do and bring it to the top. That's so interesting. And maybe here's the other funnel thing. I'll tell you. Well, I tell students all the time, what if you meet somebody who's hiring for the developer job who used to be, I don't know, like a diver or something related to swimming, or maybe they were at the Y M C a camp when they were a child. Right. There's personal connections that you could make there. And it's all about how you shape the story of what you did there and what you did, which management skills I'm hearing. Lots of stuff like that. Keep PO poking on me though. Tell me more. What's what are your thoughts? What are your reaction? Well,

Don Hansen:

I like that. So you mentioned an aspect where like a lot of people's mindset is what skills did I learn on the job of being an aquatics director will translate into becoming a developer. Yeah. But that, but that last thing that you mentioned is actually something, no one thinks about how can I relate to the interviewer. Maybe that interviewer was a lifeguard. Maybe that interviewer worked at the Y M C a before. Yes. And that, like, I'm telling you that personal connection, because my first developer job, everyone else had a technical interview. I didn't right. I was able to relate to my first manager because he did see, uh, I live stream on Twitch. So he saw me code a little bit, but also I like most of the conversation, I was super nervous in the beginning, but then, because he knew I was on Twitch, I was a gamer. And so we just talked video games, like half the interview. Awesome connection. And like that I'm telling you that interview went better than any other interview I've had.

Shaily Hakimian:

You're hitting on the biggest thing ever. Cause I know there's a lot of introverts in this space too. Like the more you have in common, the der and the simpler and easier it is to get a conversation started, especially if it feels very awkward, being an interview. Uh, I always tell. Business clients, whatever career seeking clients, like I always say sprint, this is a very shyly trademark, sprinkle, a little personal in there. Tell me you love swimming. Tell me you love to travel. Tell me you. I had one intern that was a, uh, bodybuilder. I'm like, that's interesting. Tell me the one lady I had many years ago where used to marketing for the bowls like 20 years ago. And I was like, that's so cool. One lady I worked with studied zoology, but she does interior design and I'm like, well, who's gonna make design. That's gonna work for your pets. Tell me the details. Right? Like there's so many story. Like I had one lady, this is what we're talking about earlier, where you're connecting your other past experiences to what she was gonna do. She went from working and educating museum education to wanting to be a UX designer. Right. So we're in this tech world. Right. And I was like, you know, she wants to, she said the biggest thing that she loved about the museum work is that she. You know, give an experience to people. She went from teaching in a small classroom giving experience to 20 people, went to the museum, which was able to give her give experiences to hundreds of people. But she said that what she loved is like, she wanted to give more people experiences, and she wanted to do that through websites on the internet. And I was like, huh, like your whole thing is making experiences. Wouldn't you wanna hire a UX designer? Who's all about making experiences for your customers rather than I know how to make a website work and I can do the research. That is a very, very different story. And I'm sure every person listening to this has that inside of them. They just don't know to validate it. I'm just your eyes looking at your

Don Hansen:

that's. I think so it it's pretty obvious that, um, that you've been doing this for a little bit and I think you're touching on something that like, it rarely gets said. It's it's focused on kind of like the driving factor of what you love to do and how you love to help people. And like, like you said, with the UX it's it's about this person that like, it, it wasn't even tech related. Right. She just loved the idea of ting experiences for people. And that translated into that type of UX designer, um, uh, UX person that yes, that person was gonna be, it's not necessarily focused. Like I think sometimes people focus on like, what technical skills do I need, what not even technical skills, but like what kind of skills do I actually need? And your focus more on what unique part of me is going to make me that kind of like unique UX designer, that unicorn type position that's actually gonna make me stand.

Shaily Hakimian:

Yes, I will say, uh, I'm just hearing you say all of this is like, you don't wanna be a generic person, right? There's a million people who are backend developers, million forefront, end developers, million people who do all these things, and maybe they all have the same exact, you know, certifications or experience level is that if they can imagine you in that role or they say, oh, I really want your special sauce that Don has to offer. That makes it a very different sales moment for you, cuz you're selling yourself a little bit. It means that you have a lens that you can't just buy with another developer. That's just random, right? I always say this with lawyers. So you don't want any lawyer, that's gonna solve your medical injury case. You wanna find a medical lawyer, you don't wanna get a divorce lawyer to solve your, you know, employment non-discrimination suit. You wanna be the right person for it. And it just adds extra value to what you're doing. And I would say marry this with what you know about developers. Cause I, I can't tell you with all this kind of lovely, storytelling's gonna solve all your technical skills. So what's marry our knowledge together for your, your audience, right? Because I am not in the shoes of them when it specifically for developers, but it all comes together. Uh, the other thing I'll say that I think is really cool about what you said earlier, you were talking about how the interviewers saw you on Twitch and saw you talking about stuff. The other angle here, and it's not for every single person on here. And I heard you say this on another episode of your show. Uh, like if Al people are able to, I think it was you and this guy that we were talking about, this developer role, we were mentioning it earlier. I dunno if you were your, uh, partner, that show was. That. Oh, if you have the time, if you're you have the capability, if you have the privilege to spend time building a personal brand, um, you know, it's not a bad thing to do to specialize, right? Like people know you are the expert at helping people who are figuring out if they wanna be developers and how they can get into the industry. And for someone who maybe like, who wants to be a specific kind of developer, do you have a blog that explains your knowledge? Is it a Twitch channel that says, Hey, here's, you know, here's what I think the industry needs to look like or whatever cool thing an angle you have that lets people basically have a free interview with you without ever getting on the phone. And I think that's something that people don't consider is that when they look you up on the internet, if they look you up in particular, right, there's so much content that shows that you're a genius for a lot of people. It might just be their LinkedIn profile and their reputation, which is not bad, but you can get way more information for your audience by sharing the unique lens that you have on the world to share how you use your expertise to help a company grow or whatever developer ROIs. Uh, might be there. Right. And that's a different story and they're gonna look you up and let people get that info before you, so you don't have to sell yourself as much on the phone call because it's already on the internet to showcase your greatness.

Don Hansen:

I like that. Uh, so you like that and that, that's the thing it's like, you know, people talk about creating videos. So everyone, I think has, uh, different mediums. They prefer like for. Hate writing texts. Sure. I absolutely hate writing blog posts. I just, I don't wanna write, and I don't respond to a lot of my YouTube comments, but I will engage with people on live streams all day long. Right. But LinkedIn people, it has live streams. It has video. It has images. It has, uh, I, I'm not a fan of the livestream. First of all, like it's not well, well

Shaily Hakimian:

done. I'm with you. It's a mess.

Don Hansen:

They're but video, video's pretty powerful on LinkedIn and even like writing. And so like a lot of people get intimidated with this idea of like writing some of their expertise, even sharing about like the, you know, they're going through a project. Well, what were they even trying to solve with that project? Right. And they're intimidated. Cause they're like, I gotta write this giant blog post. I don't have time to do with that. I'm coding every day. Right. But LinkedIn, uh, post specif. Like they have a cap on characters. Usually it's gonna be less than the normal amount of like content on a blog post. And so like, it has a lot of different mediums for you to express yourself and give that free interview, like you said, so actually exactly. Let's um, let's dive into LinkedIn, cuz I, I do wanna focus on this. What do you have or what advice do you have for aspiring developers where they can both increase their presentation on LinkedIn or exposure? However you wanna word it and um, even network we'll, we'll start with like the presentation and exposure and content.

Shaily Hakimian:

Yes. So these, everything we just talked about here could be applied towards, look, I'm not a cover letter expert, but you could probably put stories about you and your transferable skills on a cover letter. I hate cover letters, but it is what it is. I haven't had to write one in long, long time. Uh, the other thing I'll say the story about what your vibe is or what kind of lens you take on the programming world like that nugget should be in your about section. I think one of the. Wasted space that people have in general, when they're trying to look for a job is that summary section. And they put like, I did X, Y, Z at X, Y, Z company. I did this and I learned this skill and I'm sure like, there's, you know, listen to, whoever's telling you to stuff, keywords, if that's what, like the real strategy is for your industry. But like that also doesn't make me feel like you are a special person. If I'm a company or if I'm a recruiter, I wanna know that you're like, like you said, the unicorn what'd you call it the unicorn for which I that's, it's used a lot. What do you get? Yeah. Does the unicorn exist? Whatever they're rockstar, developer, whatever, like. Um, like that I think is the simplest way to go. And I would say the dumbest mistake that I see this can apply

Don Hansen:

business with the summary. Are you talking about, like, under your experience, the summary of the position you just worked on? Sorry.

Shaily Hakimian:

The about section, I would say first and foremost, I'm just using yours as, oh, I'm looking at yours. Yours is very short. So I'm telling, can I tell you that feedback? You're very short. You have so much room to say things in there, but I actually do love what you said. You said I help aspiring developer solidify their learning planet, job search strategy. Feel free to book private one hour session with me. If you're struggling to get that first. Oh, how cute. I love you. Help people. It's so nice. Um, but like that, right? Like your's a little more specific, but tell me the story. You have so many more paragraphs. So for the people that are looking for jobs that are listening to this, like I would say, um, tell me the unique angle in which you take your kind of work. Is there something that you appreciate? Is there something that. Think your company benefited from you that was so unique to you. The more specific, the better, I would put a few personal nuggets in there. Like we talked about earlier, like tell me what you like, if there's any hobbies, any interests, maybe any nerdy things. Cause I imagine there's a lot of nerdy things in this space. Put a few of those. If you feel comfortable, don't you don't have to share your deepest artist secrets, but like you like to cook, mention that you like to travel, mention that, um, some people mention their families that has to be the right choice for you. So I would say that the other thing, like, I don't know how deep I look into like each position, but like each job, you know, like I'm thinking of for you like the swim instructor, lifeguard, all of this stuff. Like there's a story there, right? So sometimes I tell people like write a little story, gimme context with that experience. If you think somebody's gonna read that deeply into it, is that priority. Number one for people. I would say less of a thing. I like your, like, I'm looking at you as an example. Cause they're all looking to you as an example, you do such a great job with you have a, a, a beautiful banner image that tells exactly what your deal is. No BS advice for spying, web developers. Amazing. You could, your listeners who are looking for a job could have some sort of insight there that tells people about who they are. Maybe it shows a picture of them developing. I don't know if that's, that's a little extra for your industry. Uh, but I also love that you tell people exactly what you solve in your headline, which for your people who are listening to this, um, they should do the same thing too. Like, yes, maybe they do Java or whatever. Maybe they do whatever the Python and inserting buzzwords here. Put it. Maybe they do all of that stuff, but you can also frame how you do that kind of work for customers and what it brings to your clients. And there's usually a story there they're usually there's some sort of results. So I would say those are a few nuggets with LinkedIn. Um, and I have other nuggets on networking. I know we're gonna dive into that too. yeah, lets see. Yes. Let's see, I'm looking to see if I have, uh, I have some notes here as well, but thoughts on that so far? Sure.

Don Hansen:

So I appreciate the feedback I do. I actually forgot about my, about section. So now you left here with homework I, uh, yeah, apparently I'll, I'll put it to do, but like I, so what do you think, I guess I'm gonna ask a few questions, go for it. What do you think about endorsements? Do you think employers care about that?

Shaily Hakimian:

I don't from a business perspective, but I, I don't, I don't think so, but I'm also not in the hiring world. So if somebody, if it's like, if there's a lot of people saying that it's important, fine. I don't usually worry about it. I mean, I'm just looking at this. I think the only time I get really excited about stuff like that is if I see someone I know who's endorses somebody that I wanna hire, maybe I don't feel like that's gonna be like the most on fire thing. Um, but again, there might be some recruiters who say, otherwise, I don't wanna speak on their behalf cause I am not a recruiter. So I don't know the whole landscape, but I don't think it's that important. All the things I said are more important.

Don Hansen:

I would agree with you and I, so there are several coding bootcamps that will actually get students from the coding bootcamp to endorse each other with a bunch of skills. And we did that in our coding bootcamp and it felt very like, yeah, I feel like hiring managers kind of have the sense that aspiring developers do this now. And it's just like, oh, it's such a low value thing where I don't know the, the I'm telling you the faker you are. So we have a real problem. Becoming aspiring developers of hiring managers have to go through like hundreds of applications for its entry level of right. You know, easily over a hundred people lying. And they have to distinguish that as quickly as possible. They don't have time to do it. It like. And when you get caught in a lie, when you get caught in like stuff in your endorsements, or even lied about the projects, like it put it, I've talked to dozens of hiring managers about this. Like, it puts a bad taste in their mouth and immediately it's like a red flag in the interview. Ugh. Right. And so stuffing endorsements, it, it just feels like it. It's not gonna be worth your time.

Shaily Hakimian:

Yeah. It's not gonna move the needle as much as other things will, but

Don Hansen:

like the header, you actually mentioned this idea for the heading banner or header banner, like, do you actually feel like, well, so you painted this picture of like, put your picture on it and you coding, you mentioned if you want that's well, so what would be the ideal thing that aspiring developers could do there? That is effecti.

Shaily Hakimian:

Well, I really love what you did, cuz you literally like boiled some information to the top. Like if they know visual design or if they know how to use can, but you could put more information on there of like how you wanna be shaped or how you wanna be seen. Um, is that gonna be the most again on fire thing? I would say the, the headline in your, um, like about section or probably bigger priority, but I would say having something there where it's showing you off a little bit, if you have pictures, great. I wouldn't say it's super duper urgent to have pictures, but um, I like how you did it. Like if anybody wants to see Don's LinkedIn profile, it's lovely. No BS advice for buying web developer. Okay, great. Like I like you could say like what your thing is when it comes to whatever type of programming you're involved with. Like, I like. You know, make it I'm really good at like, I have a client right now. Who's a programmer guy and his he's got a really great skill. He knows how to explain, like he explained, get, get lab to me a few weeks ago. And I, you know, I'm not the person that's probably gonna be on GitLab very often. He literally explained to me a matter of like 20 minutes or less, how to use GitLab. And now I feel really confident in it. If you are a developer and you're facing, let's say, uh, a non-program or non-techy person that you have to interface with, like my, like I'm thinking of like my boyfriend's company. And like, he has to talk to people who are, who are like account managers and, you know, account managers and, and programmers. They don't always speak the same language. And so like, if it like this guy, this client I have is very, very good at explaining stuff to non-techies in a way that they can understand. So that's a special sauce that you could highlight for people that like, oh, I'm really good at, you know, explaining programming to mortals or something. I don't know. Um, like that's something that's really, really valuable for a company. Right. Or, you know, I don't know. I don't know how valuable is this 10 X developer thing. If that's like old news now, I don't know if it's valuable to companies mention it. If it's stupid, let me know. Cause I don't know, you know, your space, I saw you nodding your head. It's kind of stupid. So it's stupid. So let's say not that, but like, you know, the, the value is that you have some sort of special angle in which you do the work that you do. And that's what you wanna boil to the top. Cuz you're competing against people with the same skills as you, but you have, if you can highlight your specialty in there, maybe that makes it easier for the programmer to be like, or the recruiter to be like, oh yes, you, um, what you bring to the table that is unique on top of whatever skills you wanna get hired for. Um, that's an idea. I like that there's a lot of ways to do it.

Don Hansen:

and, and so there are a few ways where developers can stand out one. You mentioned being able to explain technical concepts to non-technical people that, that actually huge, huge value. That's a big skill that developers lack and no matter, like what, uh, end of the spectrum of like where in the stack you're gonna be coding. Like that's going to really be valuable. That's going to huge. So huge. I think a lot of developers like, again, focus too much on technical, but they, they are also problem solvers. And they also, the more you can start thinking about the business requirements and like that is going to be super valuable and other people, the thing is like, you know, CTO, isn't the only person that's kind of like going to influence the hiring process for the engineering team as well. It's like, you know, I remember being interviewed by design UX, uh, product manager as well, um, for my first company and that like being able to relate to people of different fields through. Do you use non-technical jargon? That was huge. Like, it gave me a little bit of a boost. So if you could do that, yes, that's actually fantastic.

Shaily Hakimian:

Huge. Like, I wanna echo what you're saying one more time. Is that like, there's all these things about like different, like, like how you communicate was one of 'em and then you said something else about, um, what was the other thing you said that was like a people per, like a people skill that would make you stronger. You said something brilliant a minute ago.

Don Hansen:

Being, being able to relate to someone with non-technical jar.

Shaily Hakimian:

Yeah, absolutely. Like that's huge, right? Boiling it down, being specific, knowing even how to speak on this stuff. Like I remember, um, like I do a lot of public speaking and I have some friends who do it too. And this guy, uh, was on stage. He told me those stories, like he was on stage with like all these like fancy PhDs who know all this technical stuff that was like very, very specific. And there was four of them and he was kinda like more newer to the space. He didn't have any of the credentials, all three of those other people were super boring and not engaging and not interesting. And he got people mobilized, curious and excited. Who do you think got called back and hired again, to do a speaking engagement? The guy that knew how to like, make it fun and exciting that applies for everybody, right? You're the person that's translating all this tech stuff for people who are learning. And you're a, a perfect example of that, right? You're taking all this stuff that is very hard to find, and you're making it easy people to find in a silver PLA, which go you for doing that. Um, but that's what your people can do for themselves too. Right. Um, other weird hack, is that your headline on LinkedIn? If I hope they didn't get rid of this, but you can actually edit it on your phone and you get way more room to write details on there. Some people don't like the aesthetics of having too many words, but like you can stuff it with potentially what you want people to hire you for, but also what you did, which is tell people what you really solve. Um, and I think that's really, really huge, right. Um, I think that's, that's a fun little hack. I, I put a lot of information on my LinkedIn profile, but you know what, I don't regret it, but you make your own aesthetic decisions about how you do your profile. Um, but yeah. Tell people that story that's gonna make, getting that position so much easier of make you extra shiny for the recruiters. if you're trying

Don Hansen:

to, what about the featured section? What do you think developers should put there?

Shaily Hakimian:

Ooh, uh, I like, well, so I know you have a creator account, so they're probably unlikely to have a creator account. Let me go see if they can find an example of someone who doesn't have a creator account. um, it shows up. So you don't have a featured section. Oh, I don't think it. Do you have a featured section if you don't have a, a premium account? No, I'm not.

Don Hansen:

It's actually been a while. That's a good question.

Shaily Hakimian:

Um, it might not show, I don't, if it might just be a creator mode thing, but if I'm wrong, please call me out on it. But, uh, I would say you also have the featured section in your experience. Some people could put graphics in there. So within each job position, do you need it? No, but if you really wanna get artsy with it, there's free real estate there. That could be helpful. Um, that's something to consider the other thing to keep in mind and you do have past activity. So some of the people listening to this might comment, let's say, on your content, right. And that has the ability to populate to your network. It's like, oh, Don wrote a thoughtful comment, check it out. Uh, so a lot of the last things you engage with will show up in your activity section. And so this is, there's a couple hacks to this cause we were talking a little bit about networking too, but let's say you comment on something that shows you understand something about something technical, right? Potentially people can see that and say, oh, Don knows X, Y, Z thing. That's technical. It almost serves you like content. If you comment and engage with other people's stuff, your network will see you. The other thing is looking at the activity section of somebody you wanna like impress, maybe it's a develop or another developer who could hire you. You have that nice commission check for bringing you into their company, or maybe it's a recruiter that you really admire. Uh, if you like love and comment on their stuff. Especially, if they're not the most popular person on LinkedIn, you're gonna look like the nicest person in the world, making them feel like a celebrity. Uh, I do, I'll give you an example when this kind of happened once. So I did a bunch of workshops. I do a lot of LinkedIn training, especially. I love like the young women trying to get into tech. I dunno if I mentioned that to you, but I did a whole thing for girl con, which is this, like women's young women's conference for like teenage women who wanna do tech in the long run. And I did another workshop for this kind of age group. And I said like, who do you admire? Who do you wish you could get their attention of? And they said, uh, oh, you know, it'd be so cool if we talked to the founder of house party, which I think just recently died, unfortunately, but it was, it happened to be a woman CEO. And so these young women were looking up to her as like, wow, she could be a role model. So I looked her up on LinkedIn. She was very popular on. And then I looked her up on Twitter and I realized she was posting content on a regular basis. And not like barely anybody was engaging with her. And I told these young women, I'm like, you could go on Twitter tomorrow, respond to all of her posts and engage with her, make her feel so special when she's dying for attention. And who do you think would have an open door to having a conversation with her? Maybe getting introduction for an internship or a position or whatever. And it's funny because all these people maybe are trying to get, you know, people to react to their stuff and you're that one nice person, what a great way to make you shine to them for whatever the thing is that you want without having to like, ask for a favor or feel like you have to like reach out to someone it's a great way for you to show up like very friendly in a loving way. Like gratitude is free. Like telling people you appreciate them is free. So if there's anybody who was listening, who loves Don, tell him instead of a DM, I'm sure it'll make your day. Uh, so that's one, one other hack about what you can do with the, that section of like what content deactivity section. You can't control it necessarily, but it does. Can't. Um, let's

Don Hansen:

let's pause there. That's yeah, a lot of good advice. I . So I have kind of, I've been trying to learn about the activity section, because I mean, you can do most recent activity, but I think by default, it's sort by top and top necessarily isn't the most like, uh, engage post necessarily. But like one thing I noticed, I want you to correct me if I'm wrong, please. If I am, if someone DMS me or they comment, or they engage with my material, their feed, whatever they're doing has a higher chance of getting like on my front page and getting noticed. So is that true? Because if it's true, you can engage with hiring managers, you can engage with recruiters where that mm-hmm, all of a sudden you're at the top of their attention at the top of their feet. Is that true?

Shaily Hakimian:

Uh, kind of cause like there's you get basically what happens is when you comment on someone else's stuff, it'll show it to your network. They'll say, oh, Don commented on this. And so that does repopulate on people's feeds sometimes. Um, especially if you're you're somebody who doesn't like you're I think you mentioned earlier, like if you're stressed out about writing blog posts, so that happens. I don't know if that exactly is what you're talking

Don Hansen:

about, but I'm actually talking about specifically, like if you engage with their content, LinkedIn will prioritize your content. It's not just like exposing, like, I know what you're talking about. If, if someone in your network actually likes it, um, you can actually see it on the feed that they liked it. But I'm talking about specifically, cuz I've heard this advice from other people as well. Um, DMS are really powerful, right? If you DM someone that you're connected with that person will actually see more of your post on their feet. If they have that sort by top selected.

Shaily Hakimian:

Interesting. You know, this is interesting. So the, the algorithm stuff is. It's tricky. So I coach a group of like some, I don't know, 40 or 50 consultants, how to get more clients on LinkedIn through one of my clients. And I always tell them this, like, algorithms are important, but algorithms can change. And so if maybe this might be an opposite algorithm that I haven't cut onto, I think you and I content people like maybe this for us to worry about it a little bit more is okay. But if we're telling developer friends who we're trying to figure out their social media game or their LinkedIn game, I don't want them to get Sue sucked into the rabbit hole of algorithms. Maybe they learn it from us, but they, they shouldn't get too deep into it because if this is an update that I don't know about, like, Hey, that's scary. But what I can count on is if my network is there, I know a lot of developers get their jobs through referrals from friends. And if you're, you know, 20 best, uh, programmers are on your list, I don't know. I hope there's women listening to this too, but if you're 20 best programmers. 15%. Yes, go John. I love it. But, uh, you get your, uh, your programmer friends. If you have your best 20 or 30 people on there, and they see you on a regular basis, they might be able to say, Hey, you know, we have a job for you at XYZ company, and that is potentially more valuable than anything. And to give you a little bit of a LinkedIn nugget, right, is when you think about how many people post on link, and maybe, I don't know if all the developers need to be posting, but when you think about how many people post on LinkedIn, it's a very, very small population compared to the people who like view stuff on LinkedIn. So if you are like one of the handful of people that post content consistently, there's a very high chance that when someone in your network goes on LinkedIn, even if it's every two weeks or so, your content will still boil to the top because so few people in their network are posting regularly. So there's almost this like, guarantee that people will see whether they like it or engage with it or not. They're called people are lurking. So I want people to think about that instead of being super like overwhelmed by the algorithm, because. That's something you can't control and it's forever changing, but you can control your network. So if you have good people in your network, they will see your staff and potentially they will look at your profile. So make it ready for them.

Don Hansen:

I like that. I, and I, I mean, even touching on what you just said, uh, a while ago with that woman that would just tweet a bunch, wasn't getting tons of engagement. Yeah. Um, I'm so developers, so 90% of my audience, when I pulled this a while back, I'll probably want to do a new poll. Cause I'm curious, but 90% of people want to work for themselves eventually. And a lot of people do want to create content, but they're just, most people are just scared to, they're scared to get like the type of reaction. They don't know what they're gonna get and they're scared people are gonna judge them, et cetera. And so it's real. But when developers start, like they do post make a post about like a new app they created, or they talk about like, they like accessibility. They're like, I'm not sure. I'm not sure if I'm gonna sound stupid, et cetera, but I'm gonna put myself out there. I'm gonna share my opinions. And then when they get no engagement, you, you know, as a content creator, it takes, it's hard on you. Like, and it takes a while to get used to not like really looking at the analytics, but all these new developers and CTOs and recruiters that are trying to put themselves out there. Yeah. Like you said, when you engage with them, like that brightens up their day, that's huge. And that gets you noticed. And what happens when you engage with managers and developers on the team of the company that you are applying to? Cause it like one of the first things that companies will do is like before they put their job posting out there, be like, okay, engineers. do you have any friends? Do you know anyone that we can hire? Do you have any personal recommendations? That's one of the first things they do before they even put that job posting out there usually, or they'll kind of pair it at the same time, but what happens when you've been engaging with people on that team and they do put that job posting out there, or do you think like engaging with people on LinkedIn is a good strategy, uh, good strategy. Even if you do put your resume in like, Is that worth your time to engage with people on the team, if you're trying to apply to a company?

Shaily Hakimian:

Oh my gosh. I would hope so. Again, not a recruiter here, but like the more relationships you have the better, what do they say? Like most jobs never get posted. Right. But also too, I know this industry gets a lot of from recruiters. I think that's like a big funnel of positions. Uh, but yeah, if you have friends, like you want your friends to know what you're looking for. You want your friends to see you regularly as being awesome. Now, granted, you know, I hear from developers that they really hate LinkedIn because of the, the amount of recruiters that harass them. uh, so I know that's like a thing not quite

Don Hansen:

aspiring developers recruiters usually don't reach out to new developers.

Shaily Hakimian:

So you gotta make yourself look like you're a like shining example. Actually. Can I give you an example of somebody wonderful that maybe, maybe she might, if you're like, maybe she'll get on your show. Cause she could be a really interesting person for you. Uh, one of my longest dearest friends, dash Barka, she's all over Twitter. I think 10.3 K followers. I don't know if she's doing this, what she did. She was not a developer, but she has, she loves Luci dreaming. Like that is her passion. One of her passion things. She's trying to build a tool for Luci dreaming. And originally she's like, well I need coding. So she's like, well I should just hire someone to code for me. And then she got so frustrated with like all the stuff that she started to figure out how to program so that she could make this device. And so, you know, in the, in the like while she was studying to learn that she was doing, like, I dunno if you've heard of build in public. I think as the hashtag on Twitter, where I guess you can watch people build their technology from scratch and you could see their whole progression, but she publicly showed how she was learning to coach. She did like a hundred days of code challenge, right? Like that's an easy piece of content. For people to showcase, like what you're learning every single day. Like if I'm gonna hire like a newbie developer, like somebody who's that determined to take this extra work on, not everyone has the time to, like that says a lot about who you are. So what she did, she built in public and now she knows all this programming stuff. And she essentially built her own like wishlist, uh, service called wish tender. And she just broke 15 K in revenue this month in profits, like straight up profits. Um, and it's just her and her, uh, partner then like that, you know, she's married to like, that's it, him and her like running the whole thing. But she basically started and did, does all the coding and she she's built this thing from zero it's absolutely mind blowing. Cause she also, like many of your listeners were starting from zero. Did she ever take a bootcamp? No, but she like studied like crazy all over the internet. She's a great story. Maybe I'll tell her. I'm like, Hey, meet done. Uh, she did a lot of that stuff and she made a lot of friends. Um, through one, on one DMS for, to build up her product. And you could potentially do that with potential people who might hire you. Right. If you can be kind to them, um, if you can give context to why you're reaching out to them. I know some people don't love the vague messages, huge make it, um, make it feel like you wrote it for them. I think a lot of people will copy and paste. Like, Hey, I wanna get a job at your company. Like, I dunno, tell 'em what you can do for them. See where you can be helpful for them engage with their content. Like that's okay.

Don Hansen:

I gotta pause. I gotta pause. I gotta rant. Um, so right there do it. What do you think? The advice, the number of aspiring developers that AB they'll just post that message to like, Hey, um, so actually I'll start with me, people DME saying, Hey, can you help me find a job? Like, but what, who, who the fuck are you? Like? I, I don't know. You do you know how many DMS I get as I grow my content? Like, why should I help you get a job when, you know, like I've, I've connected and engaged with so many people. And I know that's really hard to hear, but like, I think developers, especially aspiring developers need to get into the habit of like, well, what value can I provide? Even if it's just like, Hey, um, I saw your LinkedIn post. Like, you know, I know you kind of have a controversial opinion about accessibility, but like I actually vibe with that. Um, I appreciate you posting that, right? So even if it's just relating and, and like giving people some sort of validation, that's the value you provide that's way different than, Hey, I want a job at your company. Um, can you get me hired? And I'm telling you so many people will type that message. So many people will type that really basic bare bones message of you do something for me, even though you don't know me.

Shaily Hakimian:

Huge. And I'm gonna pick a bone with your audience, potentially if they're doing this to you because or not your audience, if random strangers are doing this to you, it breaks my heart because you, you give away so much content on the internet that like, like people can like get so many answers without ever having talked to you and you also make it really accessible because you have a link to say, Hey, like purchase. Purchase a session with me, right? Like how generous is that, that you're willing to give up your time to help these people? Cause you love it and you're passionate about it. Like that's huge. I'll give you an example for my world. Like I have a blog on my, and I would probably add this show to it as well, where I literally like, people are like, oh, what do I do for my career? Like a friend will hit me up and they're like, should I leave you help with LinkedIn? And like, they're not necessarily like, you know, they're not, they're not ready to book a session or anything like that, but I really wanna help people. And I can't obviously scale my time. I can't be there for everybody. So I made a collection of all of my tips for LinkedIn and all these resources and I put it on my that's awesome. Uh, your social media Sherpa blog that has all these videos and stuff, you can watch me give LinkedIn trainings to other institutions and you could literally watch that content. And it as if you talk to me, right. And if you wanna go further, like, you know, you gimme a call and we'll see what I can do for career people. But like they have you, they should call you, right? Like you have probably stuff like, Hey, you know, check this content out for it. If you really care about these people and you have the time here's this resource is all my tip. You know, you know, one of the things that also bothers me, it happened at a networking event where people, this guy knew, like I was good at social media and he like hit me up and he's like, oh yeah, you know, I'd love to partner with you and learn from you. And I'd love for you to mentor me. And I'm like, who the F are you? And I had sent him this exact link with all of this information that was gonna help him. And I'm like, you know, before he should have said anything to me, he should have at least shown me that he at least tried to take some of the free advice I gave him before he hit me up. Right. And it's just, like you said, like they, they like, like something that you posted about, you know, boost someone's ego a little bit. It doesn't cost you much. But it'll make people so much more receptive to making connections for you. And like I said earlier, they're invested because potentially, maybe they'll get a referral bonus. I don't know if it's the same for new developers, but like if they bring you in and they hire you, they might be a perk for them. So make it easier for them to feel like you're a nice person that are, is worth their time. So, absolutely huge. Oh, here's another hack. I didn't even mention this. If you have any mutual contacts with people that you wanna impress, use that in your intro message. Right. If we have any mu like, I see people that like, I I've met over the years who follow you and I'm like, oh, that gives me more context of who you are. All these cool people are following you. Oh my gosh. This guy must be amazing. I believe it. You're fabulous. So, uh, that's also a nice little hack to keep in mind.

Don Hansen:

I like that. Right. Um, I, so

Shaily Hakimian:

just processing, I'm looking at your face. I love it. I love it.

Don Hansen:

I feel like. I feel like a lot of aspiring developers. Again, this kind of goes back to a lot of aspiring developers can do really great things in the world. And I, the way a lot, especially when you kind of start getting into this logical mindset, you start trying to identify problems in the world and how you're gonna solve that through technology. That is a very, very marketable and paid skill. And it's so powerful. And I love that developers are starting to, to value themselves more. But the problem is, oh, a lot of people are the comedies. Don't want developers that are just code monkeys anymore. That just sit there and code. They want people that actually. I help the business, identify problems, help identify bugs in your code or how features are gonna negatively impact users beforehand. And like even the way that aspiring developers will approach other people, it often shows that they have a long way to go to improve their soft skills. And that's okay. I am someone that like had to really work with this. It's something I still work with, but like, I think a lot of aspiring developers, they just, they, I don't know if it's, they don't really value it as much. They don't think it's going to be effective, but like even the way you engage with people on LinkedIn, on social platforms, like really practicing that really, uh, focus on like active listening when you're talking with people and like just the type of engagement you're, you're almost. Training yourself to be this developer that everyone wants to work with, not this brilliant developer that can solve, you know, uh, the toughest algorithm, right? Like that. There's so many developers that can do that already. You want to be a developer that people want to engage and work with, and you wanna be the developer that listens to other people. And like, you can demonstrate that even just with your initial engagement with people

Shaily Hakimian:

huge. So, so huge. Like there's so many aspects of one self that goes beyond the coding. And if you're competing against thousands of people who are new devs showing that story or that taste, or that ambition, or your background and how that relates to what you can do for somebody huge how your world mission relates to tech, maybe. Right. Like I love every time I see, like, I hate that this is real, but like there, you know, diversity in like getting women in tech is so minimal. But if you have a story, like, uh, one of the students that came to one of my trainings, like she has a whole organization, that's trying to empower young women to get a detect. And she volunteers her time doing that. I'm like what a great story to share, right? If anything, you know what, this is the side nugget. Tell me if this is relevant to your people. There are so many places where you could volunteer who have the time to do it, to volunteer and help kids learn how to code. And somebody who's new to coding could probably be a great person for that. I think they even pay people to do that. So when I was that in mind,

Don Hansen:

when I was starting out, um, yeah. Sometimes. So with traditional education usually, so I had, uh, like colleges and schools reach out to me when I was just starting to build an audience, but I think a lot of traditional education, um, they really they're behind on times. Their curriculum is usually old. And so it's great that if you can come and educate, but they also will try to validate the value that you can, you can bring based on like, you need to be a professional developer with this type of college degree and this, so that's, that's the issue with it. But if you do build an audience, you can get past that. If you can build an audience, that's also another form of proof, social proof that you can't provide value. So there, there are tons of programs that we. Uh, schools are craving people to volunteer their time to come into schools. Yeah. And especially schools that really don't have strong technical programs or introduce technical careers. You can be that person that provides that exposure for that school that just didn't have a good program to be able to do that.

Shaily Hakimian:

Yeah. And, and I think for, especially in the world, like I'm a millennial, we love mission driven things. Like if you can go into an interview saying, Hey, like I really care about the future of programming. And if somebody else is just like, I left a bootcamp last week and I'm living the fantasy of like, I'm gonna instantly get a job, but you're not like, but if you have that extra volunteer experience, it helps a ton. Like I'll I know from like, I know, well, general assembly, I was a case study project for UX students. And I, it was the most amazing experience. And one of the students had like multiple, the, the student that had, um, really great educational background who loved writing and who like really wanted to learn UX. I was like, great. And they were passionate and they were the only person in the group to like, reach out and say like, Hey, like, do you need more help outside of the program? And I hired her and I said, Hey, yes. But that gave her paid experience to like doing the job that she wanted to get. And, and actually her, and then another group member from that same team, I was both their, um, their person, uh, what do they call a reference call for their jobs and both of them now, grant, they're both amazing. But I think I put a little cherry on top when I said amazing things about them. Cause I'd worked with both of them and they were absolutely wonderful, but it, it was more than just, I was a case study project. It was like, they really went above and beyond to help me. And I was able to hire one of them afterwards and it was great. Like there's, you know, if you showcase, you know, what you can do for someone give 'em the possibilities. If you can open up the possibilities for someone who wants to hire you beyond, Hey, I have XYZ skill. Like that's magical. I have XYZ skill and I can communicate, well, I have XY Z skill. And I used to work in customer service when I was in high school. Like, I don't know I'm making this up, but like. that can make a huge difference depending on the kind of company and the company culture that you're buying into. Don't be generic. I like

Don Hansen:

that. I think we, I, I think we really honed in. Yeah. Cause I, I don't even know what I'm gonna title this now I'll figure that out. But I think we really honed in more on the mindset that, uh, of what we essentially honed in on presentations. We expanded a little bit past LinkedIn, but I think the idea of being able to relate who you are, your previous experience and what makes you unique, bringing that into being a developer that's what's gonna make you stand out among hundreds of applicants, that, of every single entry position. Um, the one thing, oh, shoot. Okay. So we have about six minutes left. I wanna be cautious of our time.

Shaily Hakimian:

I'm flexible. I'm flexible. Do what you gotta do. This is a great show.

Don Hansen:

I feel like, I feel like I want to ask one more question and then, you know, feel free to share any feedback that you haven't shared yet. So far. So, Ooh. Okay. I. I'm a big proponent that developer, or I always advocate for developers to create content. You had mentioned this story of, you know, your person that she essentially was into lucid dreaming. She eventually wanted to build an app. She shared her coding story through a hundred days of code, which I'm actually gonna caution people like, take a break, please don't do a hundred days straight. I'm telling you you're gonna drive yourself nuts. but like the idea of like being consistent and marking on your calendar, I'm gonna do yeah. Do it likes five days a week or something like that and take the weekend off. That's huge. Um, I like that, but, um, anyways, sharing your story again. That's what helped me or sharing your live coding experience, sharing how you're growing as a developer? Yes, that's what helped me skip my technical interview for my first job, but. I, I do think, um, I do think algorithm type tips could help content creators. Um, can you share any tips you know, of with the LinkedIn algorithm? Like for example, would it make more sense to write out a post or would it make more sense to create a video about your experience?

Shaily Hakimian:

Ooh, I'll say this either route. This is a big thing. Actually, this is a technical nugget that would help people. This goes with your profile and it goes with your content with your profile. There is a summary section, right? What happens is LinkedIn only shows you like the first, like two lines. And you have to click see more. If you wanna read the rest of it, I'm sure it's like some sort of data capture or something to see how engaged your profile is. But the same thing goes for your content. They'll only show you the first two lines and maybe they'll show you the like intro graphic of your video. If it's a video, if you don't hook people and tell them why they should give their minutes of their time to watching the video. No, one's gonna read it. For example, like I'll see podcast hosts doing episode 23 with Shylee. I'm not a celebrity. They don't know who Shylee is. Maybe they do. I don't know, but they don't know who I am. I'm not a mega star. What does episode 23 mean to be nothing like, but if you say, Hey, be unforgettable in a hundred days. Wait, I wanna learn about being unforgetable in a hundred days. Like that's a very different title. That's a very different description. So I would say making the cream go to the top is huge. Cause if you, if nobody clicks see more, it tells LinkedIn algorithm that maybe people don't wanna read this article. So you want people to wanna click and continue the, the text so that they read more. I like you. I do not. I love live streams. My favorite medium. Uh, unfortunately I wanted to be a LinkedIn live person, but I really, again, like you, I don't love the technology that they've put to it, but I'm glad it's there and they're working on it. I miss Periscope, bring it back, whatever , um, used to love Periscope, but, uh, but like yeah, videos do well, like videos I'm doing well right now. I think it changes all the time. Text graphics don't always do. Well. One thing I would say is don't you don't wanna post something that takes people off the platform. And if you do like the LinkedIn algorithm, like LinkedIn wants you to be obsessed, LinkedIn, they don't want you to delete. So if you post a YouTube video or an external. That also doesn't help. Like I've seen people post their portfolios or whatever. I'm like, that's fine. But like, if you can put it in a comment and say, Hey, click here for my portfolio. Maybe that's a little better on the algorithm, but you want people to click see more. You want people to click the play button. You want people to be hooked. So if you just start rambling, you like, hi, I'm Chi. And here's what I have to say today. It's probably what I mean, you know, YouTube really well. Like you don't start with like, hello, my name is you wanna hook people. So whether it's the text or the video, if you hook people and people will say, Hey, I wanna keep reading it. That's gonna tell the algorithm, Hey, this person's rocking it. Um, I also like right now, I'm liking posting on Tuesday mornings on my schedule and like E or, uh, central time, like eight ish, nine ish, 10 ish. Um, can that change? Yes. But I would say the reason why is like, is, like I said earlier in the show, uh, because I'm one of the few people in my network that consistently post on LinkedIn, uh, like they will see my content when they sign on to LinkedIn. It's a very high percentage chance. And so like when I post. What was I gonna say, they're gonna see my stuff. And I don't even know where I was going with this. Um, I don't know where I was going with this, but they'll see my stuff and it'll, it'll show up. So just, no, it has longevity, right? So when I post on a Tuesday, like people are still on LinkedIn on Wednesday, on Thursday, on Friday. If I post on like a Friday afternoon, if I don't get engagement within the first, I don't know, five or six hours, like it's probably gonna be dead. Cause it's the weekend. So the earlier in the week, I think sometimes helps. But again, you don't have to post a million times, but you know, if somebody, a recruiter is looking through your profile or not a recruiter, a I dunno, somebody that might wanna hire you looks through your profile. Like that kind of feed might help them get more context who you are. So, and you can apply that same content to your website or other places too. So maybe even on the resume to check on my LinkedIn post, I dunno, tell people where you want 'em to look. Right.

Don Hansen:

Posting a, so that's actually, um, really important. So I see people that will post, um, they'll post an article, or they'll kind of talk about like something they just created or a project they'll link to their GitHub, their YouTube video. Yeah. But they do it on the post themselves. You basically said like the key thing, every single platform it's, it's not just LinkedIn. They want you to stay on their platform. So you mentioned the idea of posting a comment instead where yeah. The actual main post will probably get more engagement. Cause people are gonna stick there and then it won't yeah. Take that post away just because they clicked on the comment or,

Shaily Hakimian:

uh, it, well, it's like less like LinkedIn is less annoyed with it because it's in the comment like, Hey, if you want the link go to the comment. Or one thing that I started to do is like, you know, like I, I give away like a collection of all of my favorite LinkedIn profiles. It has the bottom of it. The bottom of the list has a lot of career seeker ones for examples. Especially like career, like women trying to get into tech. So there's some good inspiration for, for your people. But I tell people, Hey, go to your social media Sherpa. And I sometimes write the word.com. And then I say, go to this section and you'll find the way to sign up so that I'm not putting a link outwards. Now, LinkedIn might get more creative with this. Um, so I saw like one of these algorithm, obsessed people, again, be careful with bidding tune in the rabbit hole here of algorithms. And he said like, oh, if you comment on the first, if you're the first person to comment on your own post, that also might hurt you. And I was like, oh, I don't like that. So sometimes I've waited for someone else to comment and then I'll add my comment from like this. So like, I literally I've like have gone insane overthinking this and I don't want that. Right. Psychotic that's for us to go over people like maybe like we are content people. Maybe we spend some time on it, but you have to remember the right people. It's like, this is what I tell all my clients, the right people, the right information. If you can put them together, which for a lot of these people, your network's on LinkedIn. If you can tell them some of your programming stuff, things you've built. How you, how you got excited. Oh my gosh. The dumbest thing they should put on your profile. Maybe this is for you too. How did you get into programming? Why did you go down the S route? What do you love about it? Like that will give people so much context. What do you wish the programming world understood that you get? Like, these are all such juicy things that if you can make it easy for someone to hear that story from you. Oh, my gosh. There's a chance to say like, yeah, I wanna talk to them. Right? Just like you stack the deck with all this content that made you skip your technical interview, they should stack the deck with insights. That'll make them look like the shining developer that this company is dreaming to hire. I like it. So that's, it's good advice for you. Oh my gosh. Yes. So, and look, if, if your people wanna follow me on LinkedIn, they can totally do that. And you never know. I might throw a nugget their way, like who knows? So

Don Hansen:

no seriously. I mean, this was even helpful for me. And I think, um, oh good. I think more people are interested in this, these kind of tips than. You realize, uh, but like you said, you gotta be careful of what you focus on and going down that rabbit hole. Yes. Um, cuz even for content creators, we need to be careful of it because a lot of it's ineffective even just because it starts affecting our mental health and et cetera. And we gotta look out for that. So, but like as far as a lot of the LinkedIn tips advice, um, I think so the big thing is. And I, I'm just gonna be blunt about this. Um, please linked LinkedIn tends to LinkedIn has a lot of fake posts and inauthenticity and it almost feel, you know, like basically putting your own dog down a well and videotaping it, getting rescued. And like, I, I think a lot of people don't believe a lot of these stories, they sound so made up and it's pushed so many people away from LinkedIn where like, and I can tell you, I've talked to my audience about it. You trim your feed, get rid of people like that. That like, that was the best tip. Yeah. Focus on your mental health. I'm telling you, I probably get rid of about, and now I'm going big time. Like at least 50 people a week. I just start, I'm eliminating my connections. And so just because I used to add people all the time and I'm, I'm just trying to trim it. My feet is so much better now. And then the LinkedIn platform for people that like are tired of this, you know, in authenticity and just people are posting for likes, um, You can start CRE you're gonna find that, like, if you connect with the right people, you're gonna start getting the engagement that you want for your authentic content, for your content that actually provides value and provides a lot of substance. Like, there are tons of people on LinkedIn where like, they are also tired of that, and they're just kind of just sharing their story. They're not trying to be fake about it. They're not trying to get like, so connect with people that you know, are going to, you know, emulate that style of LinkedIn that you want to see. It's it's actually pretty huge.

Shaily Hakimian:

Yes. This is everything. If you're good, like human that's normal and competent and kind there's other normal, competent and kind humans that you can connect with. And if those, you know, if your 500 connections are all really nice, good people, those are the 500 people that are gonna see you every time you show up. And those people matter. And that's, that's the magic of LinkedIn. You can get the right people to see the right information from you. It's gonna maybe make their life better and make your life better too. Chichi. Yeah. 100%. Yes. Oh, brilliant. So brilliant. So you're wonderful. That's pretty much

Don Hansen:

it. Um, I feel like it's a lot of good advice. I, I really appreciate you coming on, but I definitely wanna give you an opportunity to share all your stuff. So people wanted to reach out to you. Anything else? Any services you're offering? Um, oh

Shaily Hakimian:

my gosh. Ooh. So your social media, sherpa.com. One of the things that I really loved about doing this today is I, I love, love, love coming into companies, to schools, to institutions, to talk about how to be unforgettable on LinkedIn and how to really showcase what makes you special on the internet. So that's something I love. So if there's anybody in the audience that wants me to like, like do a little bit of what I did here with their community, I'd love to come visit your institution and, and do a training. Uh, that's one thing, the other thing I mentioned earlier is I have a collection of all of my favorite LinkedIn profiles. I just keep adding to it randomly. Uh, whenever I see someone doing something cool. And so if you go to your social media, sherpa.com, you'll see a bunch of popups that say, get my favorite LinkedIn profiles and you'll get my favorite LinkedIn profiles. And it'll get really, really easy social media tips to your inbox every other week, stay as long, little, or as long as you want. They're a little bit business themed, but they should be able to apply for developers too. If you get creatives, uh, also what else? I do have another video. I have these things I call like hacks for sale that might shop on my website and. Prerecorded videos where I give all my tips and tricks. There's one that's specifically on LinkedIn. It's a little more businessy focused, but it'll have more of these like algorithm things, how to write posts, all this kind of stuff. Um, so you can purchase that on there. And I usually tell people if they have questions after they sign up for one of these things, I'm happy to like DM them on LinkedIn and answer a few questions for them. So they're not totally stuck there with something they're like, oh my gosh. About, uh, but like I told you, there's tons of videos of me talking about LinkedIn tips and tricks and stuff on my YouTube channel on that blog about how to like, do networking and LinkedIn. There's tons of videos on this topic. So I'm, I'm not a stranger. You can find me on the Innerwebs and beyond to keep cheering you on. So that's shy. Haian at your social media. Shepa com. Okay, stick, stick complete. But, uh, it's fun.

Don Hansen:

love it. A lot of good energy from you.

Shaily Hakimian:

Oh, I love it. You too. I love what you're doing. And people need, people need this support. And somebody, I even did a podcast with some UX students who are in this struggle that I'm sure you have survived and your people are in right now. And it's, it's a tough thing, right? These schools, these boot camps, they want you to get that career. They're, they're dangling this very lucrative business for people, but it's, they don't always hand you to the place in which you can get the position. So it's people like you that are helping them bridge the gap from their schools and institutions to where they're gonna go in their career. So I commend you for it. So keep up the good . Don Hansen: I appreciate Yes. Let us know what you thought about the comments. I feel like there are, there's a lot of depth to even just, um, engaging with the developer community. In general, we talked a lot about presentation, et cetera. So if you're on YouTube, um, you know, let me know what you thought about these tips. Have you tried them, do they not work? Do they work? Um, but also if you wanna hear any other tips, definitely let us know, but, uh, Shylee, thank you so much for coming. Absolutely. Now you've inspired me. I'm like, should I offer more of these trainings for people? And I'm like, you know what, if they're a developer, they should call you. Cause you have a very easy way to book your trainings on your website. Um, definitely I do every day, but if somebody really wants that help feel free to gimme a ring and I'm gonna leave you on my favorite social media quote. Is that okay? Yeah. Go for it. So I didn't write this, but I feel like I wish I did. It's about social media is about the people, not about your business, your career or whatever, provide for the people and the people we'll provide for you.

Don Hansen:

I love it. It's good advice. We'll see you in the next episode, everyone. See.