Oct. 11, 2021

Scrimba Review (Frontend Career Path)


In this web development podcast episode, I invited on 3 graduates to review Scrimba - a front end focused educational platform for aspiring web developers. We dove into opinions about the curriculum, instructors, and projects. They even shared who they feel like this program IS for and IS NOT for. If you're considering Scrimba, it's definitely worth listening to what they had to say about it. Enjoy!

Host and Guests:
Don Hansen - https://www.linkedin.com/in/donthedeveloper
Louis Steimel - https://www.linkedin.com/in/lhsthree
Cristhian Benitez - https://www.linkedin.com/in/cristhianbenitez
Ridwan Kadri - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ridwankadri

---------------------------------------------------

🤝  Join our junior friendly developer community:
https://discord.gg/H69QqZ8MVJ

🔥  Want more personalized help from me? Here are the paid mentorship and review services I offer:
https://calendly.com/donthedeveloper

❤️  If you find my content helpful, please consider supporting me by becoming a channel member and get access to additional perks. Every little contribution helps and is actually used to pay my bills.
https://www.patreon.com/donthedeveloper

---------------------------------------------------

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links. This means that, at zero cost to you, I will earn an affiliate commission if you click through the link and finalize a purchase.

📚  Web development books and other products I recommend:
https://www.amazon.com/shop/donthedeveloper

Transcript
Don Hansen:

Welcome back to another podcast episode where we help aspiring developers get jobs and junior developers grow. We are going to be giving an honest and transparent review with CMBA, like the rest of my episodes. I don't care to sell any program. I'm gonna dig into the details. We are going to explore both the pros and the cons. So I invited three. Guests three graduates that have used the program pretty extensively on to share their experiences. Um, and like, usual, we'll go ahead and start with the intros Lewis. What program did you complete? What courses did you complete with CMBA and where are you at with the job search?

Louis Steimel:

Uh, so I've done the. Front end developer career path. They build an Instagram clone and react and the react bootcamp. Um, I've started and messed around with a few of the other ones like the UI design bootcamp, but to get back into that, um, I'm still currently I'm working currently, so that kind of put the hamper on. Being being able to find things and it's been pretty crazy at work. So I know that's just an excuse, but yeah, I'm still looking around still filling out applications, trying to talk to people here and there when I have a chance

Don Hansen:

to, okay. Are you working as a developer or are you trying to find a developer job?

Louis Steimel:

no, I'm trying to find a developer,

Don Hansen:

Jack. Okay, cool. All right. So we're gonna pay the bills and I know it's hard to just come home from work and have to learn this stuff. So kudos to you.

Louis Steimel:

Yeah.

Don Hansen:

How about you, Christian?

Cristhian Benitez:

Uh, my name is Christian, uh, and I did the front end career part with the screen button and the react book. so, uh, with applications, for jobs, I'm currently applica, like I'm sending some applications sending my resume. I'm doing my best, but yeah, what I wanna do is like, just work as a developer. Currently I'm work is as, as a construction worker in New York.

Don Hansen:

Okay. All right. Cool. Thanks for sharing. How about you red one.

Ridwan Kadri:

Yeah. Um, yeah, my name is, um, wan, uh, I did the front end career path with scuba and, uh, boomer CSS course. Uh, yeah. With regards to job set here, I'm still, uh, looking for a developer job. Um, currently I'm a web designer I build with, um, WebPress and. It's your most CSS. Um, but I'm still applying for like a major front and, uh, developer role, so, yeah.

Don Hansen:

Okay. Really cool. Um, appreciate you sharing your current job. So I think a lot of people like to hear, you know, where developers came from, cuz a lot of us have. Old industries and we bring that uniqueness into the developer job. So, all right. Let's dive into it. Um, so we're gonna talk over each other. That's completely fine. But what do you think of the program?

Louis Steimel:

Um, I was a fan of it. Uh, I've been on your podcast before for the. Man I'm forgetting the Udacity thing. So, um, I found it as a good, um, kind of addendum or kind of good to use in conjunction with that. Um, SCRs. Well, it's cheaper, which is always a plus, I mean, plus for your wallet, of course. And, um, it's, it's kind of built out a little bit differently where if you want to do things and kind of learn things how to do. in different text editors, you kind of have to go the extra step to kind of figure a few bugs and things that you have because sometimes they're, um, the way that they have their UI set up, it kind of gets buggy. If you need to add different, uh, um, depositories it, well, not post yeah, different depositories on there and different things like that. So it gets kind of. it gets a little buggy, but you, it kind of helps you by figuring it out. I worded that very strangely, but no, that makes sense.

Cristhian Benitez:

Pretty much like, uh, the whole, uh, system of learning with screen by it's, uh, from my point of view, like really cool, cause like, uh, you know, uh, and learning there's like this thing, space repetition. So they use that a lot, cuz like you're always trying to, uh, do whatever, uh, the teacher was, uh, trying to teach you. So you have time to write the code. Do you have to repeat that? So that way, like, it, it like sticks to you, like

Louis Steimel:

you learn.

Ridwan Kadri:

Yeah. Um, uh, I love how the interface is. Um, well, like we, a new, like, A developer, they force you to actually write the code like each, uh, each lesson by each lesson, you would actually practice it. So it's not just watch the video and then click next and go. No, you actually have to type it. The, give you, um, like a space to. Write your coding. It's very like interactive. So like, unless you write your best amongst all the other, uh, uh, uh, book camps of, um, uh, like attended online and then yes, it is the cheapest. Is there like cheapest for me? Um, like regarding what? And. What they teach you. And they kind of like teachers that like, come on, they're all like experts. Like they are experts like in their field, CSS experts, JavaScript experts, react experts. So like, I guess in all this for. Some like cheap amounts, you know, I, I, I think it's that like the best so far out there,

Don Hansen:

how much is the front end track? Is that something separate than the 30 month or

Cristhian Benitez:

whatever comes? Oh, it's the 30 month. And that's it. That's all you pay. It is pretty good. So for, for myself, uh, I really. I used that $30 cuz like, uh, I finished it in 30 days, so I was like,

Louis Steimel:

ah okay. Uh, like good. Yeah.

Ridwan Kadri:

I, the information 30 days, I think I use like 60 days. So I, I paid twice and then I was done.

Don Hansen:

yeah. Gotcha. So, uh, did you guys look at Treehouse Treehouse and scuba, both looked kind of similar? Uh, did you compare it to Treehouse at all? Uh,

Ridwan Kadri:

After I used the

Cristhian Benitez:

tree house. I never used tree house. Like, I, I, I hear about it, like since I I've been listening to your podcast. Okay. And with now, like it's getting controversial.

Don Hansen:

Yeah. We'll, we'll save that topic for another time. Um, but, uh, okay. So is it video based? Is that where most of the teaching happens with SCMA through video?

Cristhian Benitez:

yeah, it should videos, but the teacher is, uh, writing the code on, on their, on their, uh, like, uh, the editor, like they have like an interactive editor. Yeah.

Louis Steimel:

Okay.

Cristhian Benitez:

So, cause like, I think, I don't really know. Uh, but uh, I think they created like their own system with his called in, in impact. So the thing is like, it's like a editor for code and, and, and then you have video and, and the teacher who is coding, you see his code and you can even stop and just write, uh, just try some experiments on his code.

Louis Steimel:

okay.

Don Hansen:

Interesting. What you think of the instructors?

Louis Steimel:

They're

Cristhian Benitez:

really good. Yeah. I, I like them. Yeah. Cause like, uh, for me, I, I got, I got into ABA with the course of the free one on Java screen. Help me like a lot. Cause I, before that, I, I, I was like, uh, I wasn't confident with JavaScript, at least now, uh, with the basics, I feel pretty good.

Louis Steimel:

Yeah. All of their instructors are like, I, it sounds weird, but like a real people, they actually do this. Um, you. I mean, you could follow them. They have some of 'em have a couple different YouTube videos that are outside of the course. Um, and some of 'em even have their YouTube videos that are part of the course. Um, so like their YouTube is maybe a little bit less than what they have inside the, uh, actual like Scrubba courses. So it's kind of looks like SCR went out and found people that were already kind of helping people and added a. better way for them to show people how to do it, as opposed to just watching a video on YouTube.

Don Hansen:

Okay. Did they. did they encourage you to build any personal or side projects while you were going to the program or afterwards?

Ridwan Kadri:

So, so there are projects, uh, we build after each, um, course. So like after you finish the, uh, JavaScript course, you, you, uh, have built a game. Uh, maybe you've built maybe like a, uh, uh, like, like some set up something. So at the end of the, each course there, there's a, like, like a project. You have one you're built.

Cristhian Benitez:

Yeah. But most of the time, like, uh, you are building projects, uh, with techers like they don't see, like, you don't go out of the screen ban and build projects by yourself. You always follow along what they are doing. like, uh, one of them was, uh, creating APAC man game.

Ridwan Kadri:

Yeah.

Don Hansen:

Love that.

Louis Steimel:

so they do introduce you to different, um, dependencies and different things like that. And they, uh, do encourage you to look into it a little bit more, um, telling you that you can use them in your own project, things like that. Um, okay. They definitely don't put themselves out as the end all be all. You're going to do this and then you're going to get a job. It's kind of more, I mean, it, it kind of probably goes a little bit more with their marketing strategy as to where, like you're paying a little bit monthly and it's a little bit more of a community. So there are new things that they post there's different, what they call, um, SCRs, which are like little different practicing things that they put up that you can follow along with. And they do have a number of, um, like live videos that do they do where they take questions and things like that.

Don Hansen:

Okay. So that's really interesting that you said that. Um, so you mentioned, so it sounds like they're not trying to sell you, you know, pay 30 a month. You're gonna become a software engineer, no matter what. Right. Which is a good thing. Um, what gives you the impression that they've kind of marketed themselves or sold themselves as something that's not the end all be.

Louis Steimel:

That there's there's new things. Um, like the courses are updated. Like I'm kind of looking back at ones that I've already like completed and. Um, I can see that there's new sections that have been added and like different things have been, have been changed on the website and on the front page. I mean, you have their top thing is what their current live stream is. Obviously it's not live right now, but it was live at some point. So it's kind of all part of that. I guess, community thing, like I was talking about earlier, do

Don Hansen:

you feel like, Hmm, let me think. Do you feel like, do I wanna dive into this topic? Not yet with, okay. So a common complaint. Okay. Where do I wanna start? I have so much to say with the project that you finish with in that lesson or whatever, you're trying to learn. I think it's a really great strategy to reinforce what you're learning, use, what you're learning in a slightly different way, in a more complicated way. It helps reinforce it. Right. That's important. Um, but a common complaint with that is. A lot of that feels like they're holding your hand a bit. They're probably selecting the topic, the project. They probably have a, a, you know, when you have projects like that and, um, they might have like automatic grading or trying to pass fail based on like specific requirements that they set out. You know, they, they might have their own system to do that, but a lot a common complaint is, yeah, it's helping me reinforce what I'm learning. But it's not nearly as strong as like me going off on my own and building my own personal project. So do you feel like, I guess elaborate more on this project at the end of the course, like how much control do they have over what you can create and how do they like grade it, give you feedback, stuff like that.

Louis Steimel:

There is no, there is no grading. Yeah, there is so, so that is. That. I mean, that is definitely like, kind of the problem with it is that, but that's also why it's cheaper than doing Udacity or something like that is because you're not handing anything in and they're not grading it and returning it to you and telling you, uh, what you did wrong. So it's the onus is on you to. Do what they're asking, like, they'll give you and each, each video, like they're writing the code on the screen as they're talking and then they'll stop and they'll give you a task to complete. And then it's up to you to complete that task and figure out how to do it. But if you don't, then you just hit play and then you watch the rest of it. So that is yes, very much. It could be handholding, but it's up to you. To not let them hold your hand through it, if that makes sense.

Don Hansen:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense. And then,

Ridwan Kadri:

um, yeah, I think, uh, yeah, it is like Soly up to you. So you actually paid to come and learn. So if you finish the course and you are like given a project, you should like be able to like, Even if you like follow through, you should. So you should convince yourself you've learned something before going to the next video, or you are just like playing yourself, like, like even though they did not like greet you, you should like put your point yourself that well to learn. And I have to learn before I. Um, like go to the next thing. So it's like it's a hundred percent all on you. yeah.

Louis Steimel:

Yeah.

Don Hansen:

Okay. That sounds clear. Right. Students need to know that. And it sounds like you're gonna be a more successful developer. If you do pair what you're learning with something also practical on your own. Let me ask you this. Let's think about the Pacman game, which is, sounds like a fun thing to build. I love building games. Yeah. but let's say you finished that Pacman game. . If you go off on your own, you don't review the course at all. You just look up like documentation. If you need to look stuff up, could you build another game similar to Pacman on your own?

Cristhian Benitez:

yeah, yeah. In back my, it was, it was fun. Like it was like, uh, you got time to encourage yourself and like, uh, try new things. And then even like the interesting, it was like a, how to be like a layout for the game. That was pretty interesting.

Louis Steimel:

Okay. I don't, I don't really think so. Um, except for the fact that when I used SCRA, I also did everything outside of SCRs, uh, UI and like their code editor. So I would boot out my own code editor and have it open to the side and I would try out things, uh, that way. So I have. My GitHub that has all of my projects from there. So in fact, I could build another one because I could use parts of what I used before. I mean, at this point it was a while ago that I did that section. So it would take me a lot of refreshing myself, cuz I hadn't done anything like that a long time, but I mean I do from Scruma because I did it on my, I did it in my own code editor and everything I do have. A little bit better recollection of things, because I can go back to them and look at them. If you do it just the way that it's kind of intended, then you're not gonna have any of that backup. And you can't go back and review things, or it would be very hard to go back and review things and you wouldn't be looking at your own code. You'd be looking at the code that they put in, whether it's just spacing or whatever the hell you wanna say that it's different. It would. Be, you know, not just the same. Okay.

Ridwan Kadri:

Yeah. Uh, like similarly I have all the final projects on my local, um, machine, because I loved how we built each, um, like, uh, uh, like project. So I also like could offline. Just to have like, like a full, like understanding of how, um, everything was done. So the park one game like this, I like also like did it off scrambler. And then, so I have the, the code actually all my machine and like all my, like it get up as well. So it's like something I can like redo and like, even. Uh, like improve the UI or improve the speed or anything like now, how they like the, um, uh, like power and then the know how to know how to maybe, um, add more lives, maybe increase their like, fuck my speed. Uh, maybe increase the like, uh, uh, uh, maybe, uh, difficulty level, you know? So it's fun. Yeah.

Cristhian Benitez:

Okay. Yeah, the same, even for me the same cause like, uh, I, I wanted to feel like, uh, I was still in my project, so I work in my local reap, uh, my low. Uh, it's a computer and like, just do my own code from DS code and just, uh, if I follow alone for just do the code on and my computer, and then, uh, after I have to like deploy the app, I do like with my own file, cuz like they usually give you like the whole, the whole project to download and use it.

Don Hansen:

Okay. So it sounds like a big recommendation is to parrot kind of just with your own thing, even if it's just manipulating the project that you just built, that they told you to build. Right. Um, do you, so when you dove into these projects, you know, sometimes some of these pro programs that dive into teaching you frameworks and libraries and trying to put things together, they don't really spend a lot of time on fundamental. Do you feel like you have a solid grasp on the fundamentals?

Cristhian Benitez:

Well, uh, for JavaScript, I felt like really good with the, with the fundamentals. Cause like, uh, they gave you like, uh, a lot of, uh, work with JavaScript and then, uh, the teacher, uh, uh, Kevin Powell, he does like the HTML and TSS. So for me, it was like, I felt like pretty confident with my basics even after screen, but I now feel way more confident with the fundamentals.

Don Hansen:

Okay. What about success?

Louis Steimel:

What,

Don Hansen:

what about CSS? You mentioned JavaScript.

Cristhian Benitez:

Oh, CS. Absolutely. Uh, right now I've been doing like plenty of projects by my own like challenges. And I could do a whole responsive page with CSS cause like they, you don't have like a, well, for me, it's like the teacher, Kevin Powell. He's pretty good. So, uh, all the responsive yes. Of, um, CSS, uh, traits. It's, it's really good from the, from the career. Okay.

Don Hansen:

Yeah. Good ahead.

Louis Steimel:

They all thing good.

Ridwan Kadri:

Um, sorry. Um, he, he, he actually taught me, uh, media queries and how to make, uh, responsive, um, a web pages. So, and he taught us how to focus on, uh, mobile first, before the desktop. So he actually made sure we had like, Like, like, so like, like solid grasp on the basics, like ETL basics, the structure, like the like skeleton before you add your, like, this is like and everything. So, and then with, uh, Java script, um, Anita was very, very good with like teaching us. Basics like, like the basics. So from, from the basics, then you'd, uh, like finally build your, your game. So like then like for the mental house have been like very, very strong from SCR Skiba. Yeah. Okay. , Louis Steimel: I didn't even really cuz I had taken other courses and it actually gives you the option to still get your certificate and skip over HQL and CSS basics, and even making websites interactive as I'm looking at it right now. Um, cuz I'd already had that base. So I mean kind of. I guess I didn't take it, but kind of, to me, that kind of says like that they don't, it's not really meant to give you basics. It's kind of meant to have you go beyond that, but hearing from the other guys, it sounds different.

Don Hansen:

Okay. Yeah. I mean, you skip to fundamentals, so, um, give it, I mean, yeah, some of these programs, you know, Lewis, like you we've had you on the podcast for doing the, um, a different course. And that's an advantage giving you the option to skip over because it's kind of a waste of your money and time to go over stuff that you've already learned from other areas. So it's good. We got both the fundamentals and kind of the extension of that. So, uh, with,

Louis Steimel:

go ahead.

Cristhian Benitez:

Oh, I just think, uh, just my point of view, like, uh, it, it is not like a, a waste of money of going to the fundamentals again, cuz like every teacher could have like another approach. So those things go stick to you again. Cuz for me, I went, I started with free code camp. And then I went to YouTube videos and then I went Toba. And from all of them, I went to the basics from, from ASML CSS to Java script and with, with scream. But I was like a really stick to me cuz like the teacher were like kind of different. So yeah, from my point of views, it was like a really fun to start from the beginning again.

Don Hansen:

Okay. All right. Well, thanks for sharing. Um, with the projects that you end up with the shared projects. I think everyone probably does the same projects. Um, you come outta the program, get your certificate. Do you feel like you're competitive in the market?

Ridwan Kadri:

Uh, yes. I, um, I think so. Yes. Um, what we learned in the class, like it's, it's, it's a lot of. Information. And it's a lot of practicing, so I strongly think, yeah, we are, we are like, we are like a strong, like a competition, like okay. Almost. Yeah. Cause what you go through from, from each model. It makes you very, very like, like practical. I like the fact that you could alone, like that is how you would actually learn things like across. Well, for me, I. Learn things like first time if I like it could along like, okay, so yeah, let's do this and I'll yeah. Do the same thing or do it like separately.

Don Hansen:

So how much time specifically did you spend each week going through SCRA R one.

Ridwan Kadri:

So I did it every day, um, Monday to Friday. Um, so, uh, let's say like a three hours a day, like, like a three, four hours a day.

Don Hansen:

Okay. So. Did it, I'm gonna challenge this a bit. Um, and I want you to really think about this. You did it for three hours a day for two months, completed the program. When other coding bootcamps are three months, four months, five months, six months long. You're spending 60 hours a day, 60 hours a week. Um, and what about Skiba allows you to compete with people like that?

Ridwan Kadri:

I think it's, it's the projects we build, how we build a project, like the simplicity of what, how things are taught. How fun the lectures are. So like at the end of the, at the end of the, the day you've like, got something new, like something new, like you, you have like something new, like in your like fingertips. like you like, okay. Wow. Like, um, like, like selling out with like some new power, you know, like yeah. I have like some something, so I, I think that's like, it's like some, I think where you get outside. Like, I haven't tried, um, that. Major like field courses, but I feel at the end of the day at SCR bar, you get something like really like, you know, excellent, like, well, and I think like, it depends on you actually, me, I, I have to have to take it like, like serious. So. I had to make sure that at the end of the day, I'm getting like, like it's something new, so, okay. Yeah. Just like personal.

Don Hansen:

Yeah.

Louis Steimel:

okay. I don't that's for sure. I don't think it necessarily makes you, uh, competitive. I think it gives you a way to look at things, to figure out how to become more competitive. Um, I mean, you get a certificate that kind of, I mean, means that you completed the program. a lot of people looking at a lot of people like that are gonna listen to this podcast. Probably don't even know what grandpa is. And they're learning about it for the first time. So different recruiters and things like that might not know what it is, but it is something, there is something that you have that shows that you completed a course and that you looked and tried to find answers to think. Um, that's kind of the way that I looked at it. And that's why I think really the, with all of these. Different things. I think pairing them up with other ones is kind of the only way to make you actually get through it all and learn, unless you do a lot of work exclusively on your own. But sometimes like, I like me personally, I don't have a lot of time to do everything on my own and search for every single answer, which is not the right thing to be saying right now when I'm looking for a job, but still. Yeah. I, I think, I don't think it makes you competitive, but I think it gives you to step in that direction.

Cristhian Benitez:

Okay. Yeah. The same cuz like, uh, even like, uh, for the community they have, they have like ABA, uh, community, like channel and they compliment like, uh, whatever is fall in the, the course, like all the courses they're always, uh, helping people like, uh, they're doing like. I think like study hours. So that's how they, they do like a, the, the plus the more than, than maybe other, other two. Cause like, uh, maybe you, you went to a six month bootcamp, uh, course, whatever, but sometimes the time is not the same as like you could learn something in, in two months, maybe. Or six months, uh, for myself, I don't think, uh, time is like, uh, really important.

Don Hansen:

Okay. So wait, elaborate on that. You don't think time is, so when you say time, isn't important, you don't think the duration that you spent basically tells people how much, you know, is that kind of what you're getting.

Louis Steimel:

More

Cristhian Benitez:

like, uh, uh, quality over time. Cause like, uh, isn't like, uh, related, uh, maybe if the quality of the core is like really good. I could learn really, uh, good JavaScript, ASML and, and CSS and react. Pretty good to say that I know that. And for other courses it will be like, uh, three months, six months in that kind of time.

Don Hansen:

Okay. So I got two more questions and then I want to try summarizing this and you guys can correct me. So, first question, who is this program for type of person

Louis Steimel:

feel free to think about it. That's definitely visual learners. Okay. Um, because they're putting everything up there right in front of you. Um, I mean, I, I really thought it was helpful for me as someone who had already done a lot of things on my own. So, I mean, maybe the other guys have different experience, but I don't think that it's necessarily for beginners. Um, so I think it's people with a base that just kind of want a little bit more to do as they're kind of looking for either what kind of job they want or. just applying to different jobs. I kind of like took this course and got more into react than I would've if I, uh, wouldn't have taken it. So I kind of think it helped me learn that I wanted to like that I wanna do front end, but that I really liked react. So I think that was the value in it. And I've kind of looked at other things after taking this course for more react.

Ridwan Kadri:

Okay. So I think this course is also for, I think it's for beginners actually. It's for beginners, when you follow the beginner course, the fundamentals they teach you from scratch from doc type it's from doctor type ITML to the last. So if you don't have any idea about. HTML CSS, JavaScript react. I think like screen bias for like someone like you. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. Like, yeah. That's how I, I had like prior, um, knowledge about all of that, but I like, I, I saw how they teach and I'm like, okay. It's it's also for like somebody who doesn't know, like, like anything, like anything, that's all. Um, yeah, so that's how I saw it.

Don Hansen:

Okay. What do you think Christian? Who's up for?

Cristhian Benitez:

Um, yeah, I think it's for beginners to, uh, and even you heard, like they have. Success stories on, on the channel. Like, so people sharing the experience that they started from scratch on scream. So, uh, you see like a lot of people like, uh, they, they just never go before and, and then out of react, they, they got a job I have out of like scream. They got a job and that's that amazing for me? It's like, wow. Uh, but from like personally, uh, well, I didn't start like a beginner cause like I was, I had my, my basic on, on, on free code come on posting. So I was like, I was pretty knowledgeable on, on the ATL CSS basics and I knew react already, but I didn't feel, uh, confident enough, you know?

Don Hansen:

Okay. So who's it not for.

Louis Steimel:

uh, people that are just gonna hit play and just watch it all the way through. They're not gonna get anything from it. Uh, people that are gonna try and do it on that, like we were saying, like they have everything combined and you could just open up the webpage and just do everything in there. But if you're gonna do it like that, I don't think you're going to get anything from it. You're just gonna. Following along with what they say, and you're not gonna take anything from it at the end. Yeah. Okay.

Cristhian Benitez:

To totally cause like, uh, the fun part like that, where, where the learning is, is when you're struggling with the, uh, coding, uh, challenges. So if you're just watching the videos and just going to video and video and video, you're not gonna learn. But if you're, if you. Just when I take your time, you learn

Louis Steimel:

a lot.

Don Hansen:

How about you Redon? Who is it? Not

Ridwan Kadri:

for, for, it's not for somebody who just wants to ski through videos and finish and then like take your like, like it's educat show that oh yeah. Have something it's not for you. It's not for people who just want to just. Like round through like, um, well, I make it quick. It's for people who actually want to learn like, uh, line by line, you, if you, um, actually want to understand things line by line, you then like, uh, that's it for you. Cause it gives you, sorry. It gives you time to pause things. Think about things before you. You, uh, like continue. So if you have someone who just wants to rush through things, it's not gonna help you. Yeah. Okay.

Don Hansen:

So what could they improve?

Louis Steimel:

Um,

Ridwan Kadri:

what could improve?

Louis Steimel:

I mean, there could be. More of a focus on going over some of the text editors that you could use outside of the program. Um, and also kind of, I can't recall anything specific, but there were times when I was having issues, having something actually work live on my computer and not just on, uh, the SCR. Um, so if they kind of reviewed things like that and were kind of like, Hey, like in order to get this dependency to work, you have to do this or. Yeah. Like, I can't remember specifically, but there were like a little things where you couldn't just go from their like, online text editor to yours and get things to work. Um, which I don't know, maybe that's kind of a good thing, cuz then I had to do a little bit more research and find things out on my own on how to get things to work. Okay.

Ridwan Kadri:

Trying to think, uh, maybe, uh, they could work on their support. Uh, okay. So when I was done, uh, when I wanted my like certificate, it, like, it took like a longer time. Uh, because they said they had some issues with like, uh, I don't know, like I said for me, so how to, to like take some days, that was the only thing I experienced with them that wasn't like the like classes, but aside that, like, I don't have anything on class. Like problems with them. Like, I think it's, it's more like, um, administrative maybe stuff like support. Yeah. Kind of things. Yeah. Okay. Yeah.

Don Hansen:

How about you, Christian?

Louis Steimel:

Hmm.

Cristhian Benitez:

Uh, for me, it's just mostly just box and like stuff on the page, but the. After that like, uh, I think they're pretty good cause like for, for the price and for the level and

Louis Steimel:

what, what you get,

Don Hansen:

what if you increased the price to a hundred dollars a month, what would you say that could improve,

Louis Steimel:

uh,

Cristhian Benitez:

more courses? Uh, longer ones and, and more in depth

Ridwan Kadri:

in depth. Yeah, too.

Louis Steimel:

Okay. Yeah. Cuz like. and turning things in and having it created and return to you in a little bit more of like a hands on approach with their students, as opposed to just making it kind of up to you to go to the discord and things like that. Um, I mean, they, there's also quite a few different tasks that they could add. Like, one thing that I enjoyed doing before was, uh, messing around with SAS and there's no like, real talk of. any SA or SCSS or anything like that in there. It it's very like H L CSS react, Java script, and like the that's what they go over. I mean, there's plenty to go over within that, but if they kind of had things to either side, like, like little more things with databases and stuff like that, and, uh, my SQL and stuff like that would. It's very, very useful. Even if it's not fully in depth, still something that comes up from time to time.

Don Hansen:

Okay. That makes sense. Okay. Lot of a lot of feedback, a lot of good feedback. So, um, what I'm gonna do, I'm gonna try summing up some of this and I want you to correct me at the end. Let me, uh, finish my grant, but, um, okay. So for SCRA $30 a month gives me a very similar field of Treehouse. Um, it. it sound, it's funny because you know, I'd love hearing the mixed opinions about, is it beginner friendly? Is it not? You know, does it go over enough fundamentals? Does it not? So obviously different people have different experiences, but all three of you weren't beginners when you joined it either. So there's a little bit of a bias perspective, whatever that means, whatever that translates into. Um, so I'd be really curious and, you know, feel free if you're on YouTube, feel free to comment below if you were a beginner begin. Let us know. Did you think it was very friendly? Did you think it was, you were picking things up? I guess fundamentals are really important. They're very, very important. And that's something a lot of these project based programs, um, lack, and they don't do the best job at teaching those fundamentals and people often have to go back. So it sounds like overall. All three of you think they did a pretty good job of teaching fundamentals. You dive into, uh, different languages. They focus on HTL, CSS, JavaScript, and react. Don't really go into any CSS. Pre-process where at least in any depth, um, no SQL, um, it seems like it's pretty heavily focused on front end. That's where everyone got there. Do they teach any back? Forgot the look. Okay. So it's very front end focused, which I actually love because so many front end developers. they're like, well, I gotta learn the full stack to be competitive as a front end developer. No, you don't. You absolutely do not. You can learn front end. Get really good with JavaScript. Get really good with react. Get really good with CSS. Do you know how many front end developers are spreading their knowledge too thin in they're learning? Okay. Well, I gotta create like a really complex application, so I need a back end. I eat routing. I need a database and they're spending all this extra time, you know, learning all of this. Um, when they could like C success is hard to learn. I mean it's different. It's not, uh, the same as learning a programming language, but it's tricky. It's funky. It takes a lot of time and repetition to like really get it down. JavaScript is a really quirky language to learn. If it's your first language, it's a hard language to learn in my opinion. Um, and. Spending more time with JavaScript with CSS. That's what's gonna make you more competitive. That's what's gonna make you a stronger developer. And so I love that this program just like really strongly focuses on front end because it gives kind of a different perspective on how to become a front end developer that I think some people need to hear. And so I think that's really important. So it sounds like, you know, You know, Lewis, it was really interesting to hear you say, it's like, well, this program kind of got me to start liking react. Right. And it gave you a different flavor and perspective on front end. It sounds like. So to me that tells me this program is probably engaging. Cuz you feel like you're learning and retaining a lot of stuff. It's probably, um, You know, it sounds like it could go into a little bit more depth, but for $30 a month, just focusing on front end now I'm not so worried about the time you spent with it. It's not that bad if you're just focused on front end in that amount of time, and you're really focused on front end. It does nothing but front end. So that's pretty cool. I like that. Um, I'm curious where they're gonna end up. You said they're creating courses, right? Scrum BA's growing, they're expanding their course. Um, it sounds like the instructors, you really like the instructors. That's important. What else? As far as the projects go. it's pretty normal for them to just kind of pair the project with the course, hold your hand a bit. It's pretty normal for that program. If they really want to be strong and competitive, um, it would be interesting expanding on the project work and figuring out a way to get you to like, uh, you know, all of you said, okay, put a little extra time into your own stuff to reinforce it. Not everyone does. Right. And so if they're not like really hardly like emphasizing that and like focusing on that a lot of program or a lot of people, a lot of students aren't gonna get what you three got out of it. Right. And so I think, um, you know, the best success a student can have is like pair this program. And I agree with you Lewis on this one, paired this program with something else. And maybe it's something that goes into more depth. Maybe you start off with fundamentals, like free code camp or something like that. And you jump into SCRA. That could be a good pair potentially, but it sounds like, you know, it gets you maybe 60, 70% of the way there. And then you have that fundamental knowledge, because like, I can tell you, you know, just mentoring a lot of students. When you're just doing projects that, uh, reinforce the course that you just learned, you're not competitive at all. You have a good foundation that a lot of people might not have, but you're gonna have to build your own projects. You're gonna have to dive into depth. You're gonna have to build complexity into your projects where you're like, okay. You know, they kind of introduced us to authentication. They kind of like. You know, we just had, uh, we read a JS O file with a password or something like that, but you didn't really like learn how you're gonna be receiving data with authentication, with like, you know, JSON, web token, or session based or OOA, or, you know, like there are complexities you can dive into even further with your own projects that I think would really wrap SCRA this program up nicely. And that's where I can see students really being competitive in the market without dumping. 10 $20,000 going into debt. And, you know, you dump a lot of money into coding, boot camps. Right. So that's kind of how I see SCRA. Um, just from what I'm hearing from you, do you disagree with anything that I said or does that sound fairly accurate?

Cristhian Benitez:

That sounds fairly accurate.

Louis Steimel:

Yeah. No, that sounds good.

Don Hansen:

Okay. Cool. Well, Um, I'm gonna be diving we're not going into details, but Treehouse had an interesting history recently. Um, so I've been seriously considering looking more into SCR, but myself to be able to recommend it to people. So I'm glad we did this episode. Um, I'm probably gonna take a look at more of their courses. Maybe I'll even reach out, um, cuz I'm not really recommending Treehouse anymore, but I'll look more into. I'm kind of interested to see where they go with this program and maybe it is a very good cheap option for developers. So, uh, yeah, that's it. I'm glad we got to do this. So before we do end this podcast episode, what would one final piece of advice be that you would give for aspiring developers and just generic? It doesn't even have to be related to GRPA just like something you would've wanted to hear when you were starting out.

Ridwan Kadri:

So, um, I would say you should be, um, you should, um, like fundamentals are very, very important. Uh, you have to have a solid grasp on fundamentals before you jump into, um, frameworks or anything. Cause that was something I wasn't told. Well, I was told, but I was like, oh no, I can. I just like it happy to react. So why shall like, be strong, whatever, AF like didn't react. I'm like, okay. I don't understand what ASIC is. I don't understand what some states are. So, you know, like, let me go back and, and, and, and, and understand what all those things are before. I, I, I jump into those things. So like, fundamentals are like very, very stay in, uh, ATL CSS, Java do very, very well, like stay there till you are good before you jump to react and like all other things. Uh, so I'll strongly preach on like fundamental. Yeah.

Don Hansen:

Okay. That's good advice. and Louis, you can't reuse what you said before.

Louis Steimel:

um, I would just say, take your time. um, make sure that you're going over everything, um, take your time. And something that I really haven't done is get involved in like the discords, um, channels and different things like that. And like, I'm not super familiar with slack, but I mean, I'm part of different groups and I haven't used it as much and I should have started off like immediately, even if it's just, I mean, I've done like the generic, like introducing your. And stuff like that, but I think that's something that'll end up helping in the long run, but, but mainly take your time, like take the extra hour or whatever it is to learn how to do everything the right way. And look it up yourself as opposed to copying paste and code and things like that. Okay.

Cristhian Benitez:

Yeah, for me the same, cuz like. You should take time and really understand like the languages you're learning, cuz like it's really, uh, easy to fall, like, uh, in this sensation that you're understanding. But sometimes you're just fully yourself cuz like, uh, it's easy to for fool yourself. So for me, like, if you really understand, like, uh, JavaScript, HTML and TSS, that's, that's the best way to do it. Cuz like react frameworks and other things like they're they, they go from the basics.

Don Hansen:

All good advice. I love it. Thanks for sharing. All right. That's it. That's the episode. So, um, we'll go ahead and do our outros. So feel free to like, if you are starting a blog, trying to get a job, um, anything like that, you have social media handles, feel free to share them, but Lewis, if people wanted to reach out to you, where could they reach?

Louis Steimel:

Um, I mean, I've got my website up it's LHS T H R ee.com. Um, it's just a few projects that I have basically a quick outline of different things that I've done. Um, my email's the same at Gmail. Um, and that's about it. Uh, just still looking for a job, uh, fitting that in with work and doing band things and all that, all those other things.

Don Hansen:

Okay. and just to be clear, you're looking for a job, but you would take a full-time job to replace

Louis Steimel:

your current one. Yes, 100%. Okay, cool.

Don Hansen:

How about you,

Louis Steimel:

Christian?

Cristhian Benitez:

Um, for me, people like I use mostly I using LinkedIn, anybody like wanna talk to me just any project ideas to start? Uh, I'm Christian be and yeah, I'm I'm I'm too. I'm looking for, for, uh, job as a front end developer.

Louis Steimel:

okay. So

Don Hansen:

yeah. Sounds good. Thanks, Christian. How about you red one.

Ridwan Kadri:

Yeah. So my website is, um, with hard do com R I D K a D R i.com. Um, it's a, it's a portfolio sites, um, where all my like socials are and all my like projects are there as well. Um, almost also looking for. I want to developer role, um, aside that I would like to like collaborate with anyone for open source projects as well. Um, I feel it would also, you know, um, uh, make me learn more, uh, more things and then expand my knowledge, um, as well. So yeah, I'm open to like connecting to. Everyone, everybody, all my are on my website. So thank you.

Don Hansen:

Okay. Yeah. Cool. Sounds good. All right. Well, thanks for sharing everyone. And, um, yeah, that's the end of the episode. Let us know what you think. Um, if you're on YouTube, leave comments. Uh, what I mean specifically, I guess my question to you is what's the biggest question that you still have for SCRA that you feel like is holding you back from signing up. I'm really curious about that one. And of course, anyone that's sub on as a YouTube member Patreon, I really appreciate the sport. So I just wanna give a shout out to anyone support me. So thank you so much for that. And if you like this episode, be sure to like, it helps boost it in the algorithm and that's it. So Lewis Christian red one stick around for a couple minutes, but thanks so much for coming. Uh,

Louis Steimel:

again, thank you for.